milk toxicity, Mike Adams interviews Robert Cohen, plain text, www.NewsTarget.com: Murray 2004.12.07 rmforall

r norman rsn_ at _comcast.net
Fri Dec 10 01:29:17 EST 2004


another book" and Smith sent Exner to see Hersh who,
predictably, also endorses her story.

In the article, Smith seems conscious of her questionable
qualifications to address the serious subjects of Kennedy and
Cuba and the Church Committee. Throughout, she sprinkles in
little aphorisms to neutralize any attacks. She quotes Oscar
Wilde (not famous for his history books) when she says that
history is merely yesterday's gossip. Later on she notes that
"today's gossip is tomorrow's headline," a bit self-serving
considering her profession. Rising to an Exner-like crescendo
near the end, she quotes the ancient Greek historian Herodotus,
who felt that history "is what people have said to me and what
I've heard, that I must write down." She leaves out the fact that
Herodotus did not have access to the National Archives, 3.5
million pages of newly declassified documents, and the on the
record testimony of the principals involved via Sen. Frank
Church.

Like the Washington Post and New York Times, Smith has her
hatchet out for the Church Committee. About the most extensive
investigation of the CIA and FBI ever, she says that it was a
"little nothing of a half-assed investigation," that the report
was written by "aides and underlings" and that they asked Exner
"rather pointless questions." She finishes them off by
characterizing it as "the pathetic 1975 Church hearings," the
implication being that Smith - between interviews of Barbara
Streisand and Julia Roberts - has been digging through the newly
declassified record and will now set us straight.

But her only source is Exner. And, like Kelley, Smith seems to
avoid asking the tough questions, probably because these two have
been pals since 1977. At one point she





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