neuron connections

kenneth collins kenneth.p.collins at worldnet.att.net
Sat Dec 11 16:02:53 EST 2004


and more personal in tone. As we shall see, that personal tone
knows no limits. Through papers like the New York Times and
Washington Post, the attacks extend into the Kennedys' sex lives,
a barrier that had not been crossed in post-war mainstream media
to that time. To understand their longevity and vituperativeness,
it is necessary to sketch in how they all began. In that way, the
reader will be able to see that Hersh's book, the Vanity Fair
piece on Judith Exner, and an upcoming work by John Davis on Mary
Meyer, are part of a continuum.

The Right and the Kennedys

There can be no doubt that the right hated the Kennedys and
Martin Luther King. There is also little doubt that some who
hated JFK had a role in covering up his death. One could use
Secret Service agent Elmer Moore as an example. As revealed in
Probe (Vol. 4 No. 3, pp. 20-21), Moore told one Jim Gochenaur how
he was in charge of the Dallas doctors testimony in the JFK case.

One of his assignments as liaison for the Warren Commission seems
to have been talking Dr. Malcolm Perry out of his original
statement that the throat wound was one of entry, which would
have indicated an assassin in front of Kennedy. Bu





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