neuron connections

AngleWyrm no_spam_anglewyrm at hotmail.com
Sat Dec 11 14:28:49 EST 2004


or a personality. But I do appreciate good
research, fine writing, and a clear dedication to truth. If any
reader is interested in the real facts of her life, this is the
book to read.

Sy Hersh's "Truth"

Seymour Hersh apparently never read it. And in fact, as Robert
Sam Anson relates in the November 1997 Vanity Fair, Hersh never
thought there was a conspiracy in the JFK case (p. 108). But in
1993, a friend at ABC proposed an investigative segment for the
network on the 30th anniversary of the murder. Apparently, the
idea fell through. But by that time, Hersh had hooked up with an
old pal, Michael Ewing. Hersh then decided that a book on the
Kennedys-not necessarily the assassination- would bring him the
big money that he craved. Through big-time talent agency ICM, the
project was sold to Little, Brown for the Bob Woodward type of
money that Hersh was so envious of: a cool million.

Although Ewing appears to have been a major source for Hersh,
Anson misses his true significance. Ewing was one of the people
brought into the House Select Committee by Bob Blakey after Dick
Sprague was forced out. Ewing has never complained in public
about the failures of that inquest. There is a reason for this:
he is a Blakey acolyte. Blakey liked him so much that he gave him
a key assignment in 1978: close down the New Orleans
investigation. The HSCA had found too much corroborating evidence
supporting Jim Garrison's allegations about certain people
involved with Oswald in the summer of 1963. One of these
witnesses described elements of a conspiracy in New Orleans which
included David Ferrie and Clay Shaw. He also said that Shaw knew
Ruby. He then passed a polygraph with flying colors. That was
e





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