No Humor? (was: Re: DC lesion? - a lesson?)

Doktor DynaSoar targeting at OMCL.mil
Wed Feb 18 12:59:36 EST 2004


On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 22:58:12 GMT, "Glen M. Sizemore"
<gmsizemore2 at yahoo.com> wrote:

} And given that PET scans have brought back a sort of phrenological
} mentality, your paper will be quite timely!

Humor must have a kernal of truth!

In an advanced cognitive science class, I was first taught the history
of the field, including of the "failed science" of phrenology, and
later the fact that greater cognitive effort during development
(interacting with genetics, of course, including that of racial
genetics) can result in a larger cortex, and that can be reflected in
alterations of the cranium. And since the areas exercised can be
localized, specific changes in the skull can reflect specific
differences in the brain.

When I pointed this out, respectfully but indignantly, the professor,
hardly ever given to displays of humor, gave me a knowing smirk.

Yes, modern results are bearing out something very much like
phrenology. But it's not phrenology. It's cognitive science. As far as
I can tell the difference is due to the fact that people hate to say
"Oh, wait, maybe we were wrong before when we said that was wrong."

Still, it's the corrective aspect I'm focusing on. A sort of clinical
application (in more than one sense) designed to be administered to
those who "desparately need it". I'm sure we've all met some of them.


} "Doktor DynaSoar" <targeting at OMCL.mil> wrote in message
} news:0uh430hkmrkvik146eao6flbl70fl5midn at 4ax.com...
} > On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 13:40:46 +1000, "John H." <johnh at faraway.> wrote:
} >
} > } Peter,
} > }
} > } The best thing you can do for Ken is teach him your sense of humour and
} > } lightheartedness. Damn, they're all so serious around here, not a joke
} > } amongst the lot. I sometimes wonder if they smiled whether or not their
} > } faces would crack. I can see the headlines now: Joke told at
} Neuroscience
} > } Conference. Plastic surgeons are working around the clock to repair
} damage.
} >
} > A famous neuroscientist is out shopping with his wife, and clearly not
} > enjoying himself. She notices, and tells him, "I'm going to go buy
} > some shoes. Why don't you go to the bookstore and browse? I'll meet
} > you out in front of the store in an hour." He agrees, and she goes
} > off.
} >
} > While browsing in the bookstore, he catches the eye of a young,
} > admiring co-ed. She starts a conversation with im, and soon, he is
} > headed mto her place with her, where nature takes its course.
} >
} > Three hours later, realizing what he's done, he rushes back to the
} > bookstore, and sees his wife waiting impatiently out front, arms
} > crossed and foot tapping. Overcome with remorse, he tells her what
} > happened, admitting everything, and begging her forgiveness.
} >
} > She listens to his whole speech, and waits for him to finish. When he
} > does, she shakes her finger at him and exclaims, "DON'T LIE TO ME! YOU
} > WERE AT THE LAB!"
} >
} > =====
} >
} > I've tested the above in a stand-up act in various situations. It's a
} > big hit at scientific conferences. It goes right over the heads of
} > most at generic comedy clubs.
} >
} > I'm presently at work on a paper for the Annals of Improbable Research
} > on corrective phrenology. I've published there before, including being
} > in their "Best Of" book. I'll do what I can to lighten the mood some.
} >
} 




More information about the Neur-sci mailing list