Enlightened Empiricism, Extensionalism and the Control of Operant Behavior

David Longley David at longley.demon.co.uk
Wed Nov 3 12:17:21 EST 2004


Part III link:

<http://groups.google.com/groups?selm=QFJfeZHSY8cAFwYY@longley.demon.co.u
k>

Part II covered what some might consider to be a controversial view of 
the basics of avoidance behaviour in the context of the control of 
operant behaviour.

The following put a cautionary "gloss" on what's infected and corrupted 
behavioural science for far too long under the guise of "cognitivism". 
If anyone thinks this is merely an academic matter, they should look 
more carefully at the links at the end, and some of the series I've 
provided before (along with a considerable amount of other material on 
this issue (mainly to comp.ai.philosophy) since early 1995).

<http://groups.google.com/groups?selm=MxBYT7I587eBFw8u@longley.demon.co.u
k>

The difficulty which most folk face when trying to make sense of this is 
that they don't understand how enlightened empiricism differs from 
classic empiricism or how the extensional stance requires one to 
understand the scope of the empirical science of behaviour, ie Behaviour 
Analysis.
-- 
David Longley
http://www.longley.demon.co.uk/Frag.htm




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