No subject


Sun Apr 10 20:47:26 EST 2005


recommend an introductory text.  The book is probably out of print, but
libraries are known to collect these things, and not replace them on the
whim of new editions.  The text name is "A Primer of Psychophysiology" and
the author is Hassett, I think.  I would be more precise, but my copy is
on loan to an undergraduate at the present time.  It covers electrodes,
placement, expected responses, etc.

In general, as Kleitman found in the early 1950s, the sleeping but
dreaming brain is a lot like the awake brain, hence his term "paradoxical
sleep" for what is now called REM or dreaming sleep.  The REM term is
correct, but recent studies indicate that the dream part may be wrong,
with dreams occurring in various forms throughout the sleep time.  There are
a couple good chapters in "Principles of Neuroscience" 3rd, by Kandel,
Schwartz, & Jessell (1991).  I would buy that book, and ask it these types
of questions first.  It will give you a foundation from which to explore
the phenomenon called mind.


>can, how expensive is it to get a piece of electrical equipment which

Not cheap, but getting better.  One must certainly get the human attached
ONLY to either a low level DC amplifier, or an isolated one.  Grass makes
some good equipment which meets these requirements.  Ask around at some
labs in the psych department, or medical school.  I cannot stress this
enough.  Connecting a human directly to the ground of an amplifier, as
well as to the amp's inputs, is a good way to invite yourself to a funeral
for a friend (Elton John, some years ago...).  Always use the isoground
stuff, or an optically isolated DC amp for the first stage.

I would also go for a computerized hookup as well.  This requires an A/D
board, and some software.  See you medical school researchers for guidance
here.


>can do this? Are conductive creams required between electrodes & skin,
>or can the electronics amplify signals gotten from dry contacts? If
>anyone has any info, or any references, please email to
>mlevin at husc8.harvard.edu. 
>
>Mike Levin
>

Enjoy,
jmp.



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