No subject


Sun Apr 10 21:03:35 EST 2005


>  DvorakH at starbase1.caltech.edu (Hannah Dvorak) writes:

>>In article <8AB22AA.0E53000E32.uuout at dkb.dk>, lars.thomsen at dkb.dk (LARS
>>THOMSEN) wrote:

>>> I was wondering if any one remembered good examples of 
>>> sensory neurones with the cell bodies close to the
>>> location of the stimulus. 

>>Sure - photoreceptors.

> I would say that nocireceptors (Pacinian corpuscles, Merkels disks,
> etc.) were close to the stimulus,

They are indeed, but they are not neurons.  As I seem to
recall, these receptors are composed modified connective-tissue cells,
and are *innervated* by sensory neurons with distant cell bodies.
The generator potential occurs in the dendrite(s) of the sensory
neuron.

Similarly, gustatory cells in taste buds are made of modified
epithelial cells (I think), and again are innervated by cranial
sensory neurons in somewhat distant ganglia.
--

Steve Matheson   Program in Neuroscience   University of Arizona
sfm at neurobio.arizona.edu




More information about the Neur-sci mailing list