No subject


Sun Apr 10 21:39:47 EST 2005


hearing."
     Frey's 1962 article states:

     "Another possible location for the detecting mechanism is in
the cochlea. We have explored this possibility with nerve-deaf
people, but the results are inconclusive due to factors such as
tinnitus. We are currently exploring this possibility with
animal preparations.
     "The third likely place for the detection mechanism is the
brain. Burr and Mauro(6) presented evidence that indicates that
there is an electrostatic field about neurons. Morrow and Sepiel
(7) presented evidence that indicates the existence of a magnetic
field about neurons. Becker (personal communication) has done
some work indicating that there is longitudinal flow of charged
carriers in neurons. Thus, it is reasonable to suspect that
possibly the electromagnetic field could interact with neuron
fields. As yet, evidence of this possibility is inconclusive. The
strongest point against it is that we have not found visual
effects although we have searched for them. On the other hand, we
have obtained other nonauditory effects and have found that the
sensitive area for detecting RF sounds is a region over the
temporal lobe of the brain. One can shield, with a 2" x 2" piece
of fly screen, a portion of the stippled area shown in Fig. 6 and
completely cut off the RF sound.
     "Another possibility should also be considered. There is no
good reason to assume that there is only one detector site. On
the contrary, the work of Jones et al.(8), in which they placed
electrodes in the ear and electrically stimulated the subject, is
sufficiently relevant to suggest the possibility of more than one
detector site. Also, several sensations have been elicited with
properly modulated electromagnetic energy. It is doubtful that
all of these can be attributed to one detector."

     As you can see, the third location that he is proposing does
not involve simple mechanical effects on the cochlea via thermal
expansion. Significantly, this seems to be related to the
controversy that surrounds the debate over whether it is possible
to affect the human organism with low-level RF and microwave
energy that does not produce thermal effects. Of course, there
have been many developments in the thirty years since these
articles were written.
     I hope this information is of some use.

Sincerely yours,

Mike Coyle

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