TMS Question

Sir Frederick mmcneill at fuzzysys.com
Thu Mar 3 06:52:16 EST 2005


On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 21:04:58 +1100, Matthew Kirkcaldie
<m.kirkcaldie at removethis.unsw.edu.au> wrote:

>In article <8uhd21d8ku3tpcsfcu9ebihefqeafr9ig1 at 4ax.com>,
> "Sir Frederick" <mmcneill at fuzzysys.com> wrote:
>
>> >Yes.  Zeki used it to deactivate the perception of motion, and it can 
>> >generate phosphenes.
>> >
>> >         Matthew.
>> 
>> In this question, is the proper verb 'effect' or 'affect'?
>> 
>> In the subject, is there any automatic confabulation to 'make
>> sense' of the phosphenes? What might be a typical confabulation?
>> What are the color attributes of the phosphenes?
>
>They vary according to the source and the region stimulated, if I recall 
>correctly.  You can gently press the sides of your eyeballs with your 
>eyes closed to generate phosphenes if you like.  Somehow I suspect you 
>already know that, though.
>
>Your choice of verbs is a little obscure, but the subject stimulated 
>over MT with the appropriate latency were unable to reliably indicate if 
>a stimulus was moving or not.  It's years since I read it though - have 
>learned a lot since then, perhaps I should dig it out ... !
>
>      Cheers,
>
>         MK.

Affect is : the conscious subjective aspect of an emotion considered apart from
bodily changes

Where effect is : something that inevitably follows an antecedent (as a cause or
agent)

Thus if a TMS session produces emotion such as fear its effect is an affect,
otherwise it is only an effect.
The point is the obscurity you mentioned. Direct neural stimulation 
poses new challenges to the language.

Many neurological experiments on people show a 
compulsive need to explain by the subject by confabulation, 
the situation in socially acceptable ways.

Just interested.

--
Best,
Frederick Martin McNeill
Poway, California, United States of America
mmcneill at fuzzysys.com
http://www.fuzzysys.com
http://members.cox.net/fmmcneill/
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