[Neuroscience] Re: Thought and firing neurons

chadmaester chad.d.johnson at gmail.com
Thu Jun 8 11:20:51 EST 2006


> More seriously, the working out of brain function involves far more
> than neurons 'firing' action potentials.  There is an enormous amount
> of analog (continuously variable) signal processing going on in the
> microcircuitry of the dendrites and anaxonal or short axonal neurons,
> not to mention all the biochemical and molecular biological of the
> second messenger metabotropic synapses to account for.  All these
> factors probably play a larger role in establishing the phenomenon we
> call 'thought' than simple action potentials.

Do you think neurotransmitters and secondary messengers are critical to
emotions?

> Short term memory has many guises and is important for all aspects of
> neural function including sensory and motor processing.  There is no
> one single short-term memory store.

When neurons are done firing, how is it that we can remember something
we recently thought of for at least a few moments afterwards? Are there
temporary connections formed somewhere?

r norman wrote:
> On 7 Jun 2006 23:18:46 -0700, "chadmaester" <chad.d.johnson at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> >When our brain receive external inputs, it triggers neurons to fire in
> >a cascading manner, which I guess is what thought is.
> >
> >My question is, does thought involve anything more than (in general)
> >the firing of neurons? If not, then what is our short-term memory for?
> >Does processed information somehow get transferred to and stored
> >temporarily there? If so, then is short-term memory centralized
> >somewhere in the brain, and then if so, how does it get transferred
> >there?
> >
> >Thanks in advance!
>
> If you can explain "thought" by the firing of neurons, then please
> keep December 10 open for a trip to Sweden because the Nobel
> Foundation is sure to come calling.
>
> More seriously, the working out of brain function involves far more
> than neurons 'firing' action potentials.  There is an enormous amount
> of analog (continuously variable) signal processing going on in the
> microcircuitry of the dendrites and anaxonal or short axonal neurons,
> not to mention all the biochemical and molecular biological of the
> second messenger metabotropic synapses to account for.  All these
> factors probably play a larger role in establishing the phenomenon we
> call 'thought' than simple action potentials.
>
> Short term memory has many guises and is important for all aspects of
> neural function including sensory and motor processing.  There is no
> one single short-term memory store.



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