Info cryptosporidium

Richard Speare Richard.Speare at jcu.edu.au
Fri Feb 2 10:01:30 EST 1996


Dear Larry

On 25 Jan 1996, Larry Schwartz wrote:

> Specific questions about cryptosporidium::
> 
> 1. Can farm animal production adjacent to natural surface waters increase 
> the pathogen (cryptosporidium and giardia) count (oocyst).

> 3. Does increase of pathogen count in natural surface water increase the 
> risk of infection for users of drinking water derived from this source.

The answers to both questions appears to be "yes".

The person who can probably help with this query is Merle Olson of the
Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine,
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. T2N 4N 1.  He gave a talk
at the recent 2ND SEMINAR ON FOOD-BORNE PARASITIC ZOONOSES: CURRENT
PROBLEMS, EPIDEMIOLOGY, FOOD SAFETY AND CONTROL held at Khosa Hotel, Khon
Kaen, Thailand, 6-9 December, 1995

A copy of his abstract is appended.


GIARDIA AND CRYPTOSPORIDIUM AS FOOD-BORNE AND WATER-BORNE ZOONOSES

Olson ME

Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine,
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. T2N 4N 1

      Cryptosporidium has been recognized as an important animal pathogens
as it leads to clinical disease and death in young calves, pigs and
poultry. Cryptosporidium has recently been demonstrated to be highly
prevalent in asymptomatic farm animals. Giardia has been demonstrated in
dogs and cats (1-10%) but only recently have Giardia infections been
demonstrated to be highly prevalent in farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs
and horses). We have shown that infection rates in some Canadian herds
have reached 100% although overall prevalence in Alberta is 20% in beef
calves, 73% in dairy calves, 37% in lambs and 14% in pigs. The infection
is most prevalent in young animals but adults are frequently infected. 
Waste from agricultural animals has the potential to contaminate surface
water and lead to infections in other animals and humans.  Numerous
outbreaks have occurred when animal waste has contaminated drinking water.
Food-borne infections frequently occur when food is washed with water
containing Giardia cysts or Cryptosporidium oocysts.  Giardia and
Cryptosporidium in agricultural animals are an important source of
infections to humans and other animals.  These diseases also have a
significant economic impact to agriculture. The epidemiology of giardiosis
in animals will be discussed. Symptoms of the diseases and the diagnosis
in animals will be described as well as detection of cysts and oocysts in
water and food.  The agricultural significance will be described. New
methods to prevent and treat these protozoan parasites in animals will be
described. 

		----------oOo-------------       
                       
Copies of the abstracts of this Seminar on Food-Borne Parasitic Zoonoses
are located in a subdirectory of the Australasian College of Tropical
Medicine Gopher at James Cook University, Townsville, Australia. 

Access via Gopher:

gopher://gopher.jcu.edu.au / JCU Academic Departments / Australasian 
College of Tropical Medicine / Zoonotic Diseases / Food-borne Parasitic 
Zoonoses / 2nd Seminar on FBPZ

Via World Wide Web:

http://www.jcu.edu.au, follow the link "JCU Campus Wide Information 
Service (gopher)" and then follow the path given above for the ACTM gopher.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Rick Speare

Department of Public Health and Tropical Medicine
James Cook University
Townsville  4811
AUSTRALIA

Phone:	-61-77-225710
Fax:	-61-77-715032
email:	Richard.Speare at jcu.edu.au

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