Tapeworms

A. Kimo Morris morrisk at bcc.orst.edu
Sat Mar 15 13:26:01 EST 1997


Omar O. Barriga wrote:
> 
> "A. Kimo Morris" <morrisk at bcc.orst.edu> writes:

<snip>

> >SO, THE PUNCHLINE:  The women in the '20s who were popping worm pills
> >(no doubt thinking that more is better) probably loaded themselves
> >with many worms in hopes that "more worms" would mean more weight
> >loss, but ended up making a worthless effort even more worthless (if such a thing is possible).
> 
> >So, women (and men), if you want to lose weight, stay away from the
> >adult cestodes...  they'll just frustrate you.  I suggest using a
> >different critter to solve your weight woes.  Perhaps a nice Ascaris
> >worm or two... no more than a dozen though.  Please consult the
> >nearest parasitologists who works with malnutrition inducing
> >parasites. They might be able to provide you with what you need.  (of course, I'm kidding).  ;-)
> 
> >You're welcome,
> 
> >-- Kimo
>
>
> I resent Kimo's move against the adult cestodes. They got into this
> discussion first and, therefore, they deserve a central place in it.
> Any other attitude will be discriminatory ;-). On the other hand. Ascaris
> gets a very good press just for being the most common human parasite in the
> world. In contrast, a nice Diphyllobothrium latum would be very
> appropriate. Not only the worm will take all the length of the intestinal
> tract but the dieter will have to eat fish to get infected. Since fish is
> reputed to have a high concentration of phosphorus and phosphorus is supposed
> to be a tonic for the brain, the dieter would get smarter and may stop trying
> to loose weight in this manner :-)
> 
>         (All in the spirit of good fun . . . but with drops of true!)
> 
>                 Cheers and good weight loss!
>                                                 Omar O. Barriga

Hmmm.  I was unaware there was a dual benefit of using D. latum to 
achieve weight loss.  Clearly, the selective advantage of increasing 
ones "smarts" while trimming pounds BY FAR out-weighs (no pun 
intended) the benefits of using the critter I proposed, a plump (ooh, 
another one) ascaris worm.  Indeed, the "phosphorous advantage" would 
probably cause the dieter to seek a more reasonable method of losing 
weight after they had acheived that threshhold of intellegence 
required to see through the thick and thin (sorry, I couldn't resist).  
Besides, the whole idea of eating raw fish appeals to this islander 
(me) more so than eaing dirty, raw vegetables.  Omar, I wonder...  
should we venture so far as to label D. latum the "pound pinching 
parasite promoting perspicacity"? 

Hmm.  Perhaps cooked fish would work just as well...

Yours in jest,
      (did he say ingest?)

- Kimo
 
--------------------------------------------------------------
A. Kimo Morris              |
Department of Entomology    | Office   - (541)737-2453
Oregon State University     | FAX      - (541)737-3643
Cordley Hall 2046           | Internet - morrisk at bcc.orst.edu
Corvallis,OR 97331-2907,USA | http://www.orst.edu/~morriaar
--------------------------------------------------------------
"I hope that some animal never bores a hole in my head and lays
its eggs in my brain, because later you might think you're
having a good idea but it's just eggs hatching" -- Jack Handy



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