whipworms

Birdie birdies at ix.netcom.com
Sat Nov 1 21:27:32 EST 1997


William Reeder wrote:
> 
> Birdie,  The eggs are microscopic and require a microscope to
> find and identify. How did your friend identify them, does she
> have a microscope?

no, but her doctor's do, and she has 2 of them.

> Usually stool is treated with formaldehye, strained
> and concentrated before it is examined under the microscope.  What
> laboratory identified them?  

The CDC.

>The CDC would certainly not find trichuris
> unusual as it is one of the more common parasitic infections with about
> 500 million people infected worldwide.  

The US was what the CDC was referring to.

>Also the eggs must mature in
> warm, shaded, damp soil for about three weeks before they are infective.
> An infected person would have to have deficated on the soil to
> contaminate it. She would have to ingest the contaminated soil be become
> infected, on vegetables or on her hands.  The asian worm I mentioned is
> called Capillaria and your friend would have to have been in Asia to
> acquire it.  An infection with this worm should not be difficult to
> diagnose or eliminate. Your story is beginning to sound a bit like a
> "delusionary parasitosis" which is a psychological problem not a medical
> one.

All things considered, she hasn't had good treatment by the medical
establishment.

One doctor said it was pin worm another whip worm, a low dosage
of drugs were given and then another said it was too low and caused
them to become immune, the CDC said what they said, the lower GI
scope showed nothing and they want to do it over again plus upper
GI scoping, if this new medication fails 100% - they want to do surgery
and scrape her bowels.

That's the medical establishment, and if she were to be suffering
from "delusionary parasitosis" then, the medical establishment has
created it and is furthering it.

The trouble is, she really does have a persistent case of worms.

Birdie

Birdie



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