Giardia as a zoonosis (or not)

Andy Fell ahfell at netmatters.co.uk
Tue Sep 9 11:17:07 EST 1997


Thanks for all your responses. I wanted to know whether there was a
consensus of opinion on Giardia,
so I have a consistent story for my students. 
I think I can summarize it as: 
1. There is no reason to divide the species occuring in different mammals,
including humans.
2. But most infection is probably human to human, so there is some
restriction on gene flow between the 
populations. 
3. Widespread infection of dogs and cats does not seem to pose a risk to
their owners. 

Andy Fell

Barry Lifland <blifland at leland.stanford.edu> wrote in article
<5ul1av$bc5$1 at nntp.Stanford.EDU>...
> gordonr at computek.net (Gordon Reynolds)wrote:
> *Giardia lamblia (lamblia = species name) is the only one in this genus,
no 
> *other species.  Beavers, and perhaps other rodents are primary reservior

> *for this protozoan.  I've never heard of domesticated pets having the 
> *organism.  The microbe is transmitted via contaminated water.
> *
> Giardia muris takes great exception to this "discounting"!!
> And so does G. canis, cati, agilis, caviae, xenopi,the others I have not
> listed and of course 
> "G. species". Call your local Vet - you will get educated - many cats &
dogs
> among other domestic pets and animals can be infected with Giardia.
> BL
> 



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