Way to show mites

Gerald L. McLaughlin, Ph.D gmclaugh at iupui.edu
Thu Apr 30 15:54:55 EST 1998


I heard a talk from a specialist from Grinell on some free-living and
parasitic really ugly miniature arthropods once, including ancient species
from caves.  I think this group includes the "dust mites" of our
house-generated allergies, used to convince us to buy particular air filters
(their poop is the actual allergin, I think).  I wonder how small their
genomes are; an exercise in minimalist arthropods?  Of such are genomic
sequence contacts born these days.

Jerry
 

 At 05:23 PM 4/29/98 -0700, A. Kimo Morris wrote:
>James!  Gerry Krantz (resident acarologist at Oregon State U.,
>Entomology) always used the edge of a microscope slide to scrape the
>critters off the skin just above his eyebrows.  Yes, they are a bit
>strange looking, but then again, everything about the acari is strange
>(e.g. the fact that there are mites smaller than some protozoans boggles
>my mind).  They have invaded virtually every major niche (except the
>ocean, oddly enough), and every major suborder (except one) has
>parasitic examples.  Perhaps we should start a discussion on how varied
>parasitic mites are...
>- Kimo
>____________________________________
>A. Kimo Morris  --  Scientist
>MBC Applied Environmental Sciences
>Phone:(714)850-4830
>Pager:(714)205-7366
>FAX:(714)850-4840
>kimomorris at sprintmail.com
>Business:  http://mbcnet.net
>Personal:  http://rvlscore.org/kimo/
>
>
>James Mahaffy wrote:
>> 
>> Folks,
>> 
>>         Thought I would share a demonstration that worked great for me.  I
>> have always wanted to see if I could find hair follicle mites.  I found
>> a way of doing it and it worked great.
>> 
>>         Richard Miller (from Butler University) suggested a procedure to me
>> that he found in E.O. Wilson's book, Biodivirsity.  I pulled the skin
>> tight across the forehead and then had a student scrape the skin using
>> my trusty Swiss Army knife.  Richard uses a weighing spatula but the one
>> I tried did not have a sharp enough edge to pile the skin on top of the
>> spatula. I then put the material on a slide in a drop of immersion oil.
>> You don't need to look at them under immersion oil, the oil just
>> captures them nicely.  In fact I used only 10 and 20X so I would not get
>> oil on non-oil objectives.  There may be a bit of difference on where on
>> the face you get them. The first time I tried the middle of the forehead
>> and did not get any.  The second time we scraped right above the
>> eyebrows and added a scrape from the nose and I got three of them.  MAN
>> are they ugly.  There is an outside possibility I may have a slightly
>> different strain since I grew up in Eritrea, but I suspect US mites are
>> just as ugly. If I had not seen the eight stubby legs I would have
>> thought I had a worm. I did this with a microsope up front connected to
>> two TV screens for a large zoology class (70+) students and it worked
>> great.  It took a bit of time, but I am sure it will go quicker next
>> time.
>> 
>> Thought this was something that some of you might like to try.
>> 
>> --
>> James F. Mahaffy                   e-mail: mahaffy at dordt.edu
>> Biology Department                 phone: 712 722-6279
>> Dordt College                      FAX 712 722-1198
>> Sioux Center, Iowa 51250
>
>____________________________________
>A. Kimo Morris  --  Scientist
>MBC Applied Environmental Sciences
>Phone:(714)850-4830
>Pager:(714)205-7366
>FAX:(714)850-4840
>kimomorris at sprintmail.com
>Business:  http://mbcnet.net
>Personal:  http://rvlscore.org/kimo/
>
>
>
>
Gerald McLaughlin, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Dept Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
Indiana University School of Medicine
635 Barnhill Drive, MS A128
Indianapolis, IN  46202-5120
E-mail:  gmclaugh at iupui.edu
Ph 317-274-2651; pager 275-5000, I.D. #2916




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