NSF Traineeships at UC Riverside

elizabeth a. bray bray at MAIL.UCR.EDU
Tue Nov 14 14:15:34 EST 1995


NSF-SPONSORED GRADUATE RESEARCH TRAINEESHIPS
IN PLANT BIOLOGY

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE
THE DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY AND PLANT SCIENCES



PROGRAM FOCUS

     The plant life cycle is precisely regulated by
signaling mechanisms that are influenced by a number of
environmental factors.  Two major types of signaling
mechanisms are being studied in our department, remote
signaling which is thought to result from the cell
identifying its position in a gradient of a plant hormone,
and contact signaling in which molecules of the plasma
membrane or extracellular matrix interact with adjacent
cells.  These signaling mechanisms are being evaluated with
respect to regulation of plant development and interactions
with abiotic and biotic environmental factors.  Elucidation
of the signaling mechanisms is at the molecular, cellular,
and whole plant levels using structural, molecular and
cellular biological techniques.  Aspects of this basic
research may have direct implications for agricultural
biotechnology.

     Individuals interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in the area
of regulation of plant growth and development are encouraged
to apply for admission to the graduate program in the
Department of Botany and Plant Sciences.  Trainees will
receive a stipend of $14,000 per year and payment of all
tuition and fees, which includes a graduate student health
insurance program.  Minorities and women are especially
encouraged to apply.  Only U.S. citizens and permanent
residents are eligible for the traineeships.  The deadline
for applications for enrollment in Fall is February 1.


PARTICIPATING FACULTY


JULIA BAILEY-SERRES  Assistant Professor of Genetics.
Ph.D., University of Edinburgh, UK, 1986.  (909) 787-3738.
serres at ucrac1.ucr.edu

Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in
response to the environment in maize; oxygen-deprivation,
elevated ozone.


ELIZABETH BRAY  Associate Professor of Plant Physiology.
Ph.D., University of Minnesota, St. Paul, 1982.  (909) 787-
4548.  bray at ucrac1.ucr.edu

Regulation of plant growth and development by hormones in
tomato and Arabidopsis, especially abscisic acid; water and
salt stress.


TIMOTHY CLOSE  Associate Professor of Genetics.  Ph.D.,
University of California, Davis, 1982.  (909) 787-3318.
timclose at ucrac1.ucr.edu

Function of stress-induced proteins in maize, barley and
other crop species; water and cold stress.


ANTHONY HUANG  Professor of Plant Physiology.  Ph.D.,
University of California, Santa Cruz, 1973.  (909) 787-4783.
ahuang at ucrac1.ucr.edu

Cell biology of seed development and oil production in maize
and other oil crops.


ELIZABETH LORD  Professor of Botany.  Ph.D., University of
California, Berkeley, 1978.  (909) 787-4441.
lord at ucrac1.ucr.edu

Plant development; regulation of floral development and
pollen tube growth in model systems.


EUGENE NOTHNAGEL  Associate Professor of Plant Physiology.
Ph.D., Cornell University, Ithaca, 1981. (909) 787-3777.
nothnagl at ucrac1.ucr.edu

The role of cell surface components, especially
arabinogalactan proteins, in plant development and responses
to stress; senescence.


LINDA WALLING  Associate Professor of Genetics.  Ph.D.,
University of Rochester, Rochester, 1980. (909) 787-4687.
linda.walling at ucrac1.ucr.edu

The role of aminopeptidases in plant development and stress
responses in tomato and other crops; pathogens and wounding.


CORE CURRICULUM FOR TRAINEES


THE PLANT GENOME

     Structure and expression of nuclear and organellar
genomes of higher plants.  Special focus on gene expression,
gene mapping, gene tagging with T-DNA and transposons, and
plant organelle transformation technology.   (Walling and
Bailey-Serres)


PLANT DEVELOPMENT

     Plant life cycle with special emphasis on recent
advances in molecular genetics and cell biology.  In recent
years floral organ identity genes, signaling mechanisms, and
self-incompatibility have been emphasized.   (Bray and Lord)


MOLECULAR RESPONSES OF PLANTS TO THE ENVIRONMENT

     Recent advances in the molecular and physiological
responses of plants to abiotic stimuli including light,
temperature, moisture, soil nutrient and salt content, and
biotic stress.  The role of plant hormones is discussed.
(Bray and Close)


PLANT CELL BIOLOGY

     Examination of structure/function relationships of
components of the plant cell.  Topics include cell division,
elongation, communication, molecular sorting into
subcellular compartments, and organellar biogenesis.
(Nothnagel and Thomson)


SPECIAL TOPICS SEMINARS

     In depth coverage of topics of current interest with
discussion and oral participation by the students.   (The
Faculty)


THE DEPARTMENT

     The Botany and Plant Sciences Department includes
thirty-one faculty with diverse interests ranging from
molecular and biochemical mechanisms to that of the organism
and ecosystem.  Graduate programs leading to the M.S. and
Ph.D. degrees are offered.  Students usually spend four to
five years earning the Ph.D. degree.  An individualized
course program is determined in consultation with a faculty
guidance committee and is completed within the first two
years.  Students take a written and oral qualifying
examination, usually at the end of their second year.  The
student then completes a research project, submits a written
dissertation, and defends the thesis in a public seminar.
Laboratory rotations are encouraged in the first year.


THE UNIVERSITY

     Riverside is the smallest of the nine UC campuses with
an enrollment of 7,218 undergraduates and 1,373 graduate
students in three colleges (Natural and Agricultural
Sciences, Humanities, and Engineering).  The campus is
situated sixty miles east of Los Angeles at the foot of the
Box Springs mountains and is surrounded by a vast
Agricultural Experiment Station.  The UCR Botanical Garden
and Herbarium are renown for their collections, and the
campus maintains seven of the UC Natural Reserves.
Affordable and convenient housing is available within
walking distance of the campus, and spectacular mountains,
beaches and deserts of Southern California are within a one
hour drive.  Numerous recreational and cultural activities
may also be found in the city of Riverside.



Please contact Dr. Elizabeth A. Bray to request more
information and/or an application package.  Please note that
only US citizens and permanent residents are eligible for
these traineeship.


     Dr. Elizabeth Bray
     Department of Botany and Plant Sciences
     University of California
     Riverside, CA 92521
     Telephone: (909) 787-4548
     Fax: (909) 787-4437
     E-mail: bray at ucrac1.ucr.edu
Elizabeth A. Bray
Department of Botany and Plant Sciences
University of California
Riverside, CA  92521



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