plant movement visuals

JFRUGOLI at BIO.TAMU.EDU JFRUGOLI at BIO.TAMU.EDU
Fri Nov 22 11:09:35 EST 1996


>Jeremy,
>There are many video suppliers with time-lapse videos, film loops, etc.
>But it is so much better in-person!  I recommend planting some
>Mimosa pudica (sensitive plant)-the leaves fold instantly upon
>touch.  Another fun one is Mimulus (monkey flower).  In the flower
>is a stigma with two lobes.  Upon touch the two lobes close up.
>There are others, but these are easy to grow and students like them.
>If the season is right, Berberis japonica flowers close by touch.
>Mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia) flowers have stamens held in a
>spring trap which blasts pollen all over visiting insects of a certain
>weight.
>
>I am less enthusiastic about Venus' fly trap.  If you grow your own
>they take a long time to get very large.  If you buy from a supplier
>you cannot always be sure they grew them from culture rather than
>collecting these endangered species from the wild!
>
>ross
>
>______________________________________________________________
>                            |
>Ross Koning                 | Koning at ecsu.ctstateu.edu
>Biology Department          | http://koning.ecsu.ctstateu.edu/
>Eastern CT State University | Phone: 860-465-5327
>Willimantic, CT  06226  USA | Fax: 860-465-5213
>____________________________|_________________________________
>
>                Plant Physiology is Phun!
>
> /\|___/\     //\______COOH   NH-CH2-CH=3DC-CH2OH  \/OH
>|  |  |  |    |  |  ||       //\___     \CH3     /\|/\\/\\COOH
> \/ \/|\/|    \\/ \ /       N  ||  N            |  |
> /\ | |__|=3D        NH       |  || ||           //\//\
>  | COOH                    \\ /\ /            O
>  COOH        H2C=3DCH2         N  NH
>______________________________________________________________
>
>
Since we're on the topic-last night my husband and I watched our "Cup of Gold" (Senora 
(?) maxima) flowers open.  If you're not familiar with these plants, the 6 inch flowers 
actually burst open, often making a popping sound and filling the room with a gardenia 
like fragrance.  Since you can actually watch the petals move as the flower prepares to 
open and the actual opening takes about a minute (it's like watching a time-lapse film, 
only it's in real time!) we got into a disscussion (two scientists-what can I say?) 
about the forces that cause the flower to open this way.  Anyone familiar with this 
plant and able to shed some light on what I think it a fascinating bit of plant 
movement?
Julia Frugoli
Dartmouth College

visiting grad student at
Texas A&M University
Department of Biological Sciences
College Station, TX 77843
409-845-0663
FAX 409-847-8805
"Evil is best defined as militant ignorance."
																										Dr. M. Scott Peck



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