Creeping buttercups

Barry Meatyard Barry.Meatyard at CSV.WARWICK.AC.UK
Fri Jan 17 05:49:29 EST 1997


Dear Plant-Edders,

I'm assisting a primary school teacher in a research project set up as part
of a Continuing Professional Development (In Service Training) Project in
the UK. She is interested in a common garden weed Ranunculus repens - the
creeping buttercup. This is a very successful plant and has remarkable
powers of vegetative reproduction by runners. The question is 'Can Creeping
Buttercups creep downhill?' The obvious point being that since the runners
are modified stems they should respond to gravity by growing uphill. We are
planning a series of experiments with populations of the plant grown at
different slope angles and are also looking at the behaviour of individual
runners with respect to gravity.

A wider question arises with respect to other plants that can colonise
areas rapidly by stolons, runners or whatever - how successful are they at
spreading downhill by vegetative means?

Any observations, references or ideas?

Thanks,  Barry

Dr.Barry Meatyard                       Tel: 01203 524228
Science and Plants for Schools          Fax: 01203 523237
Institute of Education                  Email: barry.meatyard at warwick.ac.uk
University of Warwick
Coventry
CV4 7AL
UK

Dr.Barry Meatyard                       Tel: 01203 524228
Science and Plants for Schools          Fax: 01203 523237
Institute of Education                  Email: barry.meatyard at warwick.ac.uk
University of Warwick
Coventry
CV4 7AL
UK





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