transgenic crops

JFRUGOLI at BIO.TAMU.EDU JFRUGOLI at BIO.TAMU.EDU
Tue Mar 11 16:59:49 EST 1997


>Scott Shumway wrote:
>>How common are genetically engineered plants in agriculture today?  
>Are
>>Bt-toxin producing transgenic plants currently in commercial 
>production or
>>only at the development stage?  How many genetically engineered plants 
>are
>>available in the grocery store?  I have only heard of the 
>"flavor-saver
>>tomato".  Are there others?
>>
>
>I'm going out on something of a limb here because I seem to have 
>misplaced
>my reference materials, but...transgenic plants are not very common 
>yet.
>Several specific crops have received approval for commercial production 
>and
>sale, but I believe next summer will probably be the first for 
>large-scale
>seed sale. 

So far, Ciba-Geigy's Bt-corn has been approved, as has
>Monsanto's glyphosate-resistant soybeans, a virus-resistant squash from
>Asgrow, and, I think, a Bt-cotton (can't remember the developing 
>company.)

Developing company is Monsanto-large scale production of Bt cotton in 
Lousiniana and Texas occured this last summer. While I haven't got my 
references here, either...I wouldn't have called it a field trial as the 
farmers paid for the seed, and that the results were, well, mixed. My 
understanding is also that Ciba's corn has already been grown andwas 
intended to be mixed into the produce line with "regular" corn-that's 
the source of the flack in Europe.  The transgenic squash has been 
availible to homegardeners for 2 years-it's called "New Freedom" and is 
sold by Parks Seed and other companies.


There were several "News and Views" pieces in Science, Nature and Nature 
Biotechnology on this in the past few months-perhaps someone with a 
better retention of references can help us out or correct any mistakes 
I've made?
Julia Frugoli
Dartmouth College

visiting grad student at
Texas A&M University
Department of Biological Sciences
College Station, TX 77843
409-845-0663
FAX 409-847-8805

"Evil is best defined as militant ignorance."
																										Dr. M. Scott Peck



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