Question

wise at VAXA.CIS.UWOSH.EDU wise at VAXA.CIS.UWOSH.EDU
Tue Nov 3 15:12:33 EST 1998


Jon,

I agree with you.  The fact that they are wind borne means they can get up
your nose.  But then why are there only about 70 species that cause alergic
reactions (at least in the USA)?  Aren't there more than 70 wind-pollinated
plant species in the USA?

Cheers

Bob

>Dan Cosgrove et al. discovered that pollen allergens are actually wall
>loosening expansins involved in helping to create the passageway between
>stigma cells for pollen tip growth (see a recent review in Plant Physiology
>118: 333).  If that is true, then they probably don't have anything to do
>with recognition.  Since all pollen probably has expansins, I would predict
>that pollen from insect pollinated plants is also allergenic.  Since it is
>sticky (in order to stick to insects) is doesn't ever get the chance to get
>up our noses like wind-blown pollen!
>
>Jon
>
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