Phytochrome and hormones

Grant R. Cramer cramer at MED.UNR.EDU
Fri Apr 30 14:28:19 EST 1999


Bill,
Your explanation makes sense but is there evidence that phytochrome does not
move? There are soluble forms, correct?
--
Grant R. Cramer
Associate Professor
Mail Stop 200
Department of Biochemistry
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
phone: (775) 784-4204
fax: (775) 784-1650
email: cramer at med.unr.edu
web page: http://BIOCHEM.MED.UNR.EDU/faculty/grant_c/

----------
>From: Bill Purves <purves at THUBAN.AC.HMC.EDU>
>To: cramer at med.unr.edu ("Grant R. Cramer")
>Subject: Re: Phytochrome and hormones
>Date: Fri, Apr 30, 1999, 12:06 PM
>

> At 11:50 AM 4/30/99 -0700, you wrote:
>>Today a student stumped me by asking me why phytochrome is not considered a
>>hormone. Does anyone have an answer?
>
> Phytochrome acts in the same place where it is activated.  It's not
> a "signal" moving from one part of the plant to another.  Tell the
> student it's the same thing as asking about chlorophyll--chlorophyll
> does mighty potent stuff, but it does it where it was located to
> begin with.  A hormone, by definition, is produced in one place and
> acts in another.
>
> (bill)
>
>
> William K. Purves      Vice President/Editorial Director
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