Plant flowering and the first day of Summer

I don't like spam! spam.spam at spam.spam.com
Tue Jun 8 05:37:05 EST 1999


Out of curiosity, more than anything else, this question has mulled
around in the back of my mind for some time now. Forgive me for the
lack of more specific, scientific terms:

As the longest day of the year approaches, the first day of Summer,
the day to day change in daylight hours gets very small. Lacking a cue
from a changing photoperiod, do fewer plant species in an area begin
their flowering period around the first day of summer than at other
times of the year? On a similar thread, are there "peak" times of the
year for the number of plant species blooming based upon rapidly
changing photoperiods, around the first day of Spring and Fall? I
realize that the Spring bloomers are taking advantage of additional
available light before the deciduous trees leaf out. But in areas
where there are no deciduous seasons, are there peak blooming periods
around these days of rapidly changing photoperiods?

(No, this is not a test or essay question, simply a curiosity.)



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