Definition of Plant

Stephen M Jankalski CEREOID at prodigy.net
Fri Oct 8 18:01:53 EST 1999


In the evolutionary sense, rhodophyta ARE chloroplasts. There is no
messiness because they are the progenitors of the organelles themselves.
Modern eukaryotes arose from a symbiotic relationship between prokaryotes
and some long extinct ancestor. The organelles mitochondria and the
plastids have their own separate DNA.

Ross Koning <koning at ECSUC.CTSTATEU.EDU> wrote in article
<l03130307b423e6118fb5@[149.152.32.4]>...
> At 7:16 AM -0500 10/8/99, Stephen M Jankalski wrote:
> >In other words, they have chloroplasts!
> >
> >Jon Greenberg <jongreen at BLUEMARBLE.NET> wrote in article
> ><37FD5C60.87324DA at bluemarble.net>...
> >> At BSCS, we have been following Lynn Margulis' book Five Kingdoms,
which
> >> defines plants as multicellular photoautotrophs that develop from
> >> embryos.
> 
> But there are organisms...Rhodophyta...for
> example...which DO have chloroplasts, but
> which are probably NOT Plantae. This is where
> some of the "messiness" of "plants" arises.
> 
> ross
> 
> ________________________________________________________________
> Ross Koning                 | koning at ecsu.ctstateu.edu
> Biology Department          | http://koning.ecsu.ctstateu.edu/
> Eastern CT State University | phone: 860-465-5327
> Willimantic, CT 06226 USA   | fax: 860-465-4479
> ____________________________|___________________________________
> 
> Electronic services composed and served from •Macintosh hardware.
> 
> 
> 



More information about the Plant-ed mailing list