plant evolution

Monique Reed monique at mail.bio.tamu.edu
Wed Aug 30 11:46:12 EST 2000


One or another of the recent papers/projects dealing with phylogeny of
green plants, land plants, or just the angiosperms, as deduced from
DNA sequencing might help a student visualize how researchers can
track change over time.  I've lost my bookmark for the Angiosperm
Phylogeny Group, which published a monumental paper, but the citation
is: Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (1998). An ordinal classification for
the families of Flowering Plants. Ann. Missouri Bot Gard. 85, 531–553.

Also:
Manhart, J.R. and J.D. Palmer. 1990. The gain of two chloroplast tRNA
introns marks the green algal ancestors of land plants. Nature
345:268-270. 

M. Reed

Virginia Berg wrote:
> 
> I received the following (solicited) message from a student in a non-majors'
> class.
> 
> "I was wondering if you could post some key sources that explain the
> evolution of plants. I was just wondering where the scientists get their
> information about plant evolution over hundreds of millions of years. Isn't
> most of this information just speculation?  I would greatly appreciate it if
> you could provide some more insight on this.  Thanks!"
> 
> (Iowa freshman: polite and cheerful.)  I would guess that his mind is made
> up, but I do want to be able to provide sources for him.  Can anybody help
> me?  Web addresses would be especially useful.
> 
> My greatest victory in this department was a student who once wrote, "I
> don't believe it happend this way, but for the first time I understand why
> others do."  Education happens!
> 
> --Gini Berg
> 
> Today three billion people will eat rice.
> The genome is being sequenced.
> 
> Virginia Berg  (bergv at uni.edu)
> Biology Department 0421
> University of Northern Iowa
> Cedar Falls, IA 50614
> (319) 273-2770 (phone), 273-2893 (fax)
> http://www.uni.edu/berg
> 
> ---






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