Update tree-sitter Ginkgo in Ashland, Oregon

CorK kwantenzap at xs4all.nl
Mon Dec 4 16:07:41 EST 2000


On 4 Dec 2000 13:28:03 GMT, una at mars.its.yale.edu (Una Smith) wrote:

It might well be the first tree on earth, you're not well informed.

>Anyway, the sex of cultivated Ginkgo trees in North America is quite
>irrelevant because these trees are not part of a breeding population.

That's just the point:
Ginkgo trees have either male or female gametophytes, but not both.
Landscapers plant only male trees, and that's why the species can't
survive in the wild - not enough females. 

>talulah1 at my-deja.com writes:
>
>> Who gives a you-know-what if the Ginkgo is a "native" or not!!!  It
>>IS one of the oldest trees known to man
>
>No, it isn't.
>
>Ginkgo biloba is special because it is the sole remaining species of
>a group that was once far more diverse.  That group diverged from its
>closest living (i.e., extant) relatives about 350 million years ago.
>
>Anyway, the sex of cultivated Ginkgo trees in North America is quite
>irrelevant because these trees are not part of a breeding population.
>
>-- 
>	Una Smith		una.smith at yale.edu
>
>	Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
>	Yale University






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