Update tree-sitter Ginkgo in Ashland, Oregon

PMDavis nospampmdlandarch at earthlink.net
Tue Dec 5 11:43:53 EST 2000


What does what landscapers plant have to do with the survival of the tree
"in the wild"?  Are you suggesting that landscapers are planting Gingko in
their native range in an attempt to reestablish the wild populations?  Or
are you saying that the parks and streets in urban areas across north
America are "wild" areas?



CorK wrote in message <3a2c0667.9253057 at news.xs4all.nl>...
>On 4 Dec 2000 13:28:03 GMT, una at mars.its.yale.edu (Una Smith) wrote:
>
>It might well be the first tree on earth, you're not well informed.
>
>>Anyway, the sex of cultivated Ginkgo trees in North America is quite
>>irrelevant because these trees are not part of a breeding population.
>
>That's just the point:
>Ginkgo trees have either male or female gametophytes, but not both.
>Landscapers plant only male trees, and that's why the species can't
>survive in the wild - not enough females.
>
>>talulah1 at my-deja.com writes:
>>
>>> Who gives a you-know-what if the Ginkgo is a "native" or not!!!  It
>>>IS one of the oldest trees known to man
>>
>>No, it isn't.
>>
>>Ginkgo biloba is special because it is the sole remaining species of
>>a group that was once far more diverse.  That group diverged from its
>>closest living (i.e., extant) relatives about 350 million years ago.
>>
>>Anyway, the sex of cultivated Ginkgo trees in North America is quite
>>irrelevant because these trees are not part of a breeding population.
>>
>>--
>> Una Smith una.smith at yale.edu
>>
>> Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
>> Yale University
>
>







More information about the Plant-ed mailing list