Update tree-sitter Ginkgo in Ashland, Oregon

Rick Toomey toomey at museum.state.il.us
Thu Nov 30 16:42:54 EST 2000


Hello, 

CorK wrote:
> 
> Definitions seem to differ about what is a native plant or not.
> For instance in Minnesota  Native Plant Terminology they say:
> 
> "Exotic Species
> 
>     Federal Rule
>     All species of plants and animals not naturally occurring, either
> presently or historically, in any ecosystem of the United
>     States. [Executive Order No. 11987, 42 Federal Register 26949]
> 
>     Acer platanoides, Norway maple, is an exotic species. It is native
> from Norway south as far as Switzerland.
> 
>     By this rule, Pinus resinosa, red or Norway pine, is not an exotic
> species, although it is not native to either the prairie or
>     the hardwood ecosystems of southern or western Minnesota.
> 
> Native Species
> 
>     Federal Rule
>     All species of plants and animals naturally occurring, either
> presently or historically, in any ecosystem of the United States.
>     [Executive Order No. 11987, 42 Federal Register 26949] "
> 
> Ref.: http://www.mnstac.org/RFC/nativedef.htm
> MnSTAC consists of state, county and local officials, scientists,
> educators, representatives of community, nonprofit
>       and business organizations and private citizens. A direct result
> of the committee's work is the development of a
>       working relationship among the agencies principally responsible
> for state-wide programs: University of Minnesota
>       Extension and research), Minnesota Departments of Agriculture,
> Natural Resources, and Transportation.
> 
> >Hello,
> >
> >CorK wrote:
> >
> >> Up till now  the City of Ashland has not take any action to try to
> >> save the monumental 100 years old Ginkgo that is one of the few old
> >> and female Ginkgos in the USA and deserves our respect and protection.
> >> It is also a native tree looking at the fossil record in the western
> >> part of the US.
> >
> >NO, the fossil record does not support the idea that
> >Gingko biloba is a native tree to Oregon.
> 
> >

I would agree that the term native is defined
in different ways.  However, I would suggest
that the ginkgos in Oregon are not native under 
the definitions you have provided above.  
They are not presently naturally occurring in 
any ecosystem in the United States. So, 
the question comes down to the definition
of historically.  I would argue that since
7 million years ago is well beyond the 
period of historic record (actually somewhat
beyond the fossil record of the genus Homo), 
it would be difficult to classify that as 
"historically" present.


Rick Toomey
Illinois State Museum
toomey at museum.state.il.us






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