Sonic Bloom??

Sandra Johnson sjohnson at mtsu.edu
Fri Feb 7 08:27:18 EST 2003


i'd be interested to read this site - what is the url?
it would be interesting to challenge students to find the flaws in this
information, like the points gini berg mentioned, with or without the
lab work.

sandra


[moderator's note - I searched google for "sonic bloom" and found loads
of sights... How long has it been around?  - Jon Monroe]


> > This is what one site said:
> >
> > "Bird song stimulates the opening of the stomata of leafy plants, thus
> > enabling them to respire and take on nutrients from the air. The sonic
> > bloom technology utilises this knowledge. By broadcasting birdsong
> > frequencies (embedded in music) and spraying a nutrient rich mist over the
> > plants, the plants can be stimulated into taking on much more nutrient than
> > in normal conditions and greatly increased growth can be seen. Flowering
> > and fruiting is also improved, and resistance to blights and disease
> > increased. Plants exibit hitherto unseen patterns of growth, given the
> > inexhaustable supply and take up of nutrient, these new patterns are
> > carried on to the next generation.  The challenge is to integrate this
> > technology into the farming system of the future in harmony with nature. It
> > remains to be seen whether this is possible."
> >
> > have you encountered this?  What do you think?
> >
> > Martha Phillips
> > Biology Dept.
> > The College of St. Catherine
> > mmphillips at stkate.edu
> >
> > ---
> 
> --
> ---------------
> There is a certain madness comes over one at the mere site of a good map.
> -Freya Stark, "Letters from Syria"
> 
> Dr. Virginia Berg
> Professor, Plant Physiology
> Biology Department
> University of Northern Iowa
> Cedar Falls, IA USA 50614-0421
> 
> bergv at uni.edu
> http://www.uni.edu/berg
> office: 319 273-2770
> fax: 319 273-2893
> 
> ---



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