[Plant-education] Re: Plant-ed Digest, Vol 16, Issue 9

David Alan Walker d.a.walker at sheffield.ac.uk
Mon Aug 28 16:02:48 EST 2006


 Liked Janice's suggestion but could only manage one riddle (clue?) i.e what
did Oberon to say to Puck about where Titania felt most comfortable?.
Come to think of it though, how about  ³In a ******** bell I lie² or "My
love is like a red ,red,**** that' newly sprung in June? Or, if we wish to
Reflect a more sombre world, "In Flander's fields the ******* grow?

Beyond that, mention of leaf discs by David Hersey inevitably brought to
mind  

DELIEU T, DA WALKER 1981 Polarographic measurement of
photosynthetic O2 evolution by leaf discs. New Phytol 89: 165-175

Not cheap I grant you but not unthinkable perhaps? I have used this in
classes in many, so-called, third-world countries where totally
inexperienced students could come up with accurate and reproducible
measurements of quantum yield in less time than it would take to say Otto
Warburg. (O.K. I exaggerate but with the automated version you can do that
in ten minutes). 

Best regards

David

>From David Walker, FRS., Emeritus Professor of Photosynthesis, University of
Sheffield, UK.


On 28/8/06 6:01 pm, "plant-ed-request at oat.bio.indiana.edu"
<plant-ed-request at oat.bio.indiana.edu> wrote:

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> Today's Topics:
> 
>  1. Intro to Greenhouse Lab (Robyn Wolin)
>  2. Re: Intro to Greenhouse Lab (Janice M. Glime)
>  3. Re: Intro to Greenhouse Lab (David R. Hershey)
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Message: 1
> Date: Sun, 27 Aug 2006 12:47:40 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Robyn Wolin <rwwolin at yahoo.com>
> Subject: [Plant-education] Intro to Greenhouse Lab
> To: plant-ed at magpie.bio.indiana.edu
> Message-ID: <20060827194740.23686.qmail at web61220.mail.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
> 
> Hi,
> 
> I am starting to prepare my syllabus for my HS class of Intro to  Botany.  In
> the first few weeks of school I am looking to do a lab  to Introduce the
> greenhouse to the students.  Does anyone have a  good lab to introduce the
> greenhouse?
> 
> Thanks,
> Robyn
> 
> 
> 
> ---------------------------------
> Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls.  Great rates
> starting at 1?/min.
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 2
> Date: Sun, 27 Aug 2006 19:42:32 -0400
> From: "Janice M. Glime" <jmglime at mtu.edu>
> Subject: Re: [Plant-education] Intro to Greenhouse Lab
> To: Robyn Wolin <rwwolin at yahoo.com>, plant-ed at magpie.bio.indiana.edu
> Message-ID: <44F22DE8.5080704 at mtu.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
> 
> You could have them work in pairs or small groups and do something
> similar to a scavenger hunt.  You could give each group a different list
> of things to find (but not collect).  Then they could later show these
> to the class (depending on how large the class is).  Alternatively, you
> could have two lists, pair the groups, and they teach what they find to
> the group with the opposite list.  Be creative in your questions, or
> even make some riddles.  They can find a plant that grows on trees, one
> with thorns, one that is pollinated by birds, one used to make rope, one
> that produces fruits - anything of interest that can teach them
> something about the plants.
>  Another approach is for each pair or group to select three plants and
> make riddles for the others to find the right plant.  That might be a
> bit more unpredictable to orchestrate.
> Janice Glime
> Michigan Technological University
> 
> Robyn Wolin wrote:
>> Hi,
>>   
>>   I am starting to prepare my syllabus for my HS class of Intro to  Botany.
>> In the first few weeks of school I am looking to do a lab  to Introduce the
>> greenhouse to the students.  Does anyone have a  good lab to introduce the
>> greenhouse?
>>   
>>   Thanks,
>>   Robyn
>>   
>>   
>> 
>> ---------------------------------
>> Talk is cheap. Use Yahoo! Messenger to make PC-to-Phone calls.  Great rates
>> starting at 1?/min.
>> _______________________________________________
>> Plant-ed mailing list
>> Plant-ed at net.bio.net
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> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 3
> Date: 27 Aug 2006 16:48:53 -0700
> From: "David R. Hershey" <dh321 at excite.com>
> Subject: [Plant-education] Re: Intro to Greenhouse Lab
> To: bionet-plants-education at moderators.isc.org
> Message-ID: <1156722533.622133.105910 at i3g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
> 
> What length of lab are you looking for and is the greenhouse going to
> be used extensively for student projects?
> 
> Many greenhouse labs take weeks because students grow crops. The
> students often set up most of the projects early in the semester so
> they have time to grow. Some examples would be
> 1. Grow a crop of chrysanthemums or poinsettias so students gain
> experience with photoperiod control, irrigation, fertilization,
> pinching, growth regulator application, etc.
> 2. Root cuttings
> 3. Germinate seeds and grow a crop of bedding plants
> 4. Air-layer overgrown houseplants
> 5. Force bulbs such as daffodil or tulip
> 6. Hydroponic experiments, such as producing mineral nutrient
> deficiencies/toxicities
> 7. Comparing plant growth with different levels of light, water,
> fertilizer, salt, soil pH, etc.
> 8. Comparing plant growth with different types of soil or fertilizer
> 9. Comparing plant growth with and without biological nitrogen fixation
> 
> Starting with rooted cuttings, the first project would take about 3
> months and would require students to revisit the project frequently and
> someone to take care of the plants on a daily basis.
> 
> For a first lab, students may just receive an orientation on their
> greenhouse experiments for the semester and the greenhouse procedures,
> such as sanitation, irrigation and fertilization methods, etc. and then
> just pot some plants, bulbs, seeds or cuttings for one or more of the
> long-term experiments.
> 
> A single 1-3 hour lab could involve student measurement of potted plant
> transpiration or photosynthesis under greenhouse versus outdoor and lab
> environments. Transpiration can be measured cheaply with a balance. Tie
> a plastic bag around the stem to prevent evaporation from the pot and
> soil surface. There are photosynthesis systems for teaching or the
> inexpensive leaf disk method can be used (see reference). It would also
> be worthwhile for students to measure light levels in those three
> environments so they could correlate their transpiration/photosynthesis
> data with the light level.
> 
> Another way to introduce greenhouses might be a tour of a good
> commercial, university or botanic garden greenhouse.
> 
> 
> David R. Hershey
> http://www.angelfire.com/ab6/hershey/bio.htm
> 
> Reference
> 
> Exploring Photosynthesis with Fast Plants
> http://www.fastplants.org/pdf/activities/exploring_photosynthesis.pdf
> 
> 
> Robyn Wolin wrote:
>> Hi,
>> 
>>   I am starting to prepare my syllabus for my HS class of Intro to  Botany.
>> In the first few weeks of school I am looking to do a lab  to Introduce the
>> greenhouse to the students.  Does anyone have a  good lab to introduce the
>> greenhouse?
>>   
>>   Thanks,
>>   Robyn
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
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> End of Plant-ed Digest, Vol 16, Issue 9
> ***************************************




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