[Plant-education] Re: Plant-ed Digest, Vol 71, Issue 3

T Fox via plant-ed%40net.bio.net (by auntama from gmail.com)
Thu Jul 21 16:33:10 EST 2011


Microtom tomato plants provide another opportunity for small stature plants
if you want to play with them...

On Thu, Jul 21, 2011 at 10:05 AM, <plant-ed-request from oat.bio.indiana.edu>wrote:

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> Today's Topics:
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>   1. Re: First-year plant lab (Janice Glime)
>   2. Re: First-year plant lab (Jon Monroe)
>   3. RE: First-year plant lab (Robinson, Dr. David)
>   4. Re: First-year plant lab (Martha Phillips)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2011 13:28:47 -0400
> From: Janice Glime <jmglime from mtu.edu>
> Subject: Re: [Plant-education] First-year plant lab
> To: Jon Monroe <monroejd from jmu.edu>, Plant-ed from magpie.bio.indiana.edu
> Message-ID: <4E27104F.1080705 from mtu.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
>
> Jon,
>   Do you have adequate facilities for growing things?  Students could
> ask various questions about how the phyla handle light or moisture
> alteration or nutrients, or they could culture gametophytes and compare
> viability or time to maturation or requirements.  Tropisms are fun, but
> only need a few days; they could ask questions about light vs gravity in
> a variety of kinds of plants (phyla) and compare these to their common
> habitats.  I am thinking it might be fun to experiment with pillbugs and
> look at herbivory on the various phyla, then look at protein,
> carbohydrate, and defense compounds and compare these with growth rate
> and where the plants live.  That would take less room and could probably
> be done with one plant group at a time if necessary, or a series of
> experiments.  Do you have any opportunity for a field trip to see the
> various phyla?  Students could hypothesize about protein, carbohydrate,
> defense, and degree of herbivory based on field observations and design
> some experiments to test their hypotheses.  Feeding experiments are fun
> and lead to more questions.  Students could develop a second set of
> hypotheses related to seasons, kind of herbivores, food preferences, why
> those preferences.  This could be used to tie together many concepts of
> evolution, systematics, ecology, and physiology.
> Janice
>
> On 7/19/2011 11:47 PM, Jon Monroe wrote:
> > Hi all,
> >
> > We're looking for an investigative, multi-week plant lab to use in a
> > first-year biology course.  Do you have such a lab that works well and
> > that students like?  Our course is called Organisms and it is a walk
> > through the nodes of the phylogenetic tree, so it isn't a diversity
> > course, but it isn't heavily cellular either.  Thanks!
> >
> > Jon
> >
>
> --
> Dr. Janice Glime, Professor Emerita
>   (Michigan Technological University)
> Manager of Bryonet, Past President of IAB
> 219 Hubbell St.
> Houghton, MI 49331 USA
> email:  jmglime from mtu.edu
> phone:  906-482-1610
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2011 14:09:08 -0400
> From: Jon Monroe <monroejd from jmu.edu>
> Subject: Re: [Plant-education] First-year plant lab
> To: Janice Glime <jmglime from mtu.edu>
> Cc: Plant-ed from magpie.bio.indiana.edu
> Message-ID: <4E2719C4.5020908 from jmu.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1"; format=flowed
>
> Thanks for the reply, Janice.  We're rather space limited now, but we'll
> be moving into a new building in a year.  This is a large course: 17
> sections of 24 students each semester, currently taught in one lab
> room.  In the new building there will be two rooms.  We don't have
> adequate greenhouse space now, but that should change.  Currently, we
> grow several kinds of plants on growth carts in the lab, and that much
> of it works but the lab itself is what we're looking to change.  We're
> aiming for something halfway between a cookbook lab and one where
> students generate independent questions.
>
> Jon
>
>
> Janice Glime wrote:
> > Jon,
> >   Do you have adequate facilities for growing things?  Students could
> > ask various questions about how the phyla handle light or moisture
> > alteration or nutrients, or they could culture gametophytes and
> > compare viability or time to maturation or requirements.  Tropisms are
> > fun, but only need a few days; they could ask questions about light vs
> > gravity in a variety of kinds of plants (phyla) and compare these to
> > their common habitats.  I am thinking it might be fun to experiment
> > with pillbugs and look at herbivory on the various phyla, then look at
> > protein, carbohydrate, and defense compounds and compare these with
> > growth rate and where the plants live.  That would take less room and
> > could probably be done with one plant group at a time if necessary, or
> > a series of experiments.  Do you have any opportunity for a field trip
> > to see the various phyla?  Students could hypothesize about protein,
> > carbohydrate, defense, and degree of herbivory based on field
> > observations and design some experiments to test their hypotheses.
> > Feeding experiments are fun and lead to more questions.  Students
> > could develop a second set of hypotheses related to seasons, kind of
> > herbivores, food preferences, why those preferences.  This could be
> > used to tie together many concepts of evolution, systematics, ecology,
> > and physiology.
> > Janice
> >
> > On 7/19/2011 11:47 PM, Jon Monroe wrote:
> >> Hi all,
> >>
> >> We're looking for an investigative, multi-week plant lab to use in a
> >> first-year biology course.  Do you have such a lab that works well
> >> and that students like?  Our course is called Organisms and it is a
> >> walk through the nodes of the phylogenetic tree, so it isn't a
> >> diversity course, but it isn't heavily cellular either.  Thanks!
> >>
> >> Jon
> >>
> >
>
> --
> Jonathan Monroe, Professor
> Department of Biology
> 820 Madison Dr.  MSC 7801
> James Madison University
> Harrisonburg, VA 22807
> 540-568-6649, http://www.jmu.edu/biology/
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2011 18:46:14 +0000
> From: "Robinson, Dr. David" <drobinson from bellarmine.edu>
> Subject: RE: [Plant-education] First-year plant lab
> To: "'Jon Monroe'" <monroejd from jmu.edu>, Plant-ed
>        <Plant-ed from magpie.bio.indiana.edu>
> Cc: "Lau, Dr. Joann" <jlau from bellarmine.edu>
> Message-ID:
>        <B0B43B6BB92D7D46AA595FCB06CE9B9A0CB4D2E5 from BUESFS.bellarmine.edu>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> Jon:
>
> I've been involved in two lab exercises that you might be interested in.  I
> co-developed the first with the Education division at Bio-Rad Laboratories:
>
> http://www.bio-rad.com/evportal/en/US/evolutionPortal.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=productsPage&catID=701bc018-fb80-4525-969c-fbc288025924
>
> The complete kit takes 6-8 weeks to complete and exposes students to a wide
> array of laboratory experiences, including bioinformatics. In this project,
> students isolate the gene of a housekeeping gene from a plant species of
> their choosing.  Once the gene has been cloned and sequenced, that
> information can be published as a DNA Accession in the NCBI GenBank. Since
> the gene is from a novel plant species there is room for phylogenetic
> analysis, as well. Students (and faculty) like seeing their names in the
> GenBank. I do this in my Molecular Biology course. Here is a recent article
> I co-authored on this:
> http://www.lifescied.org/cgi/content/abstract/8/4/326
>
> Our second lab exercise is cheaper and only takes 2 weeks...."The Ambrosia
> Project".  Students do minipreps of clones from a cDNA Library that we have
> made from Ragweed pollen.  After plasmid isolation we get it sequenced and
> students analyze it using BLAST searches, etc.  No one has published a cDNA
> library from Ragweed pollen before so each of the sequences we find are new
> and can be submitted to the NCBI GenBank. I do this in my Botany course
> where most of the students are pre-med.....they like the biomedical
> implications of this project (after all, Ragweed pollen causes hayfever, one
> of the few major diseases caused by plants).
>
> We have the cDNA library and are willing to mail you as many clones as you
> need as long as you are willing to share the cDNA sequences you find.  You
> have to pay for the plasmid isolation kits and the DNA sequencing. Again,
> students like seeing their names in the GenBank EST database, and even cite
> it in their resumes. We have already found some surprising genes expressed
> in Ragweed pollen, but am looking for collaborators at other institutions to
> help us screen the library.  Here is an abstract on this project:
>
> http://2011.botanyconference.org/engine/search/index.php?func=detail&aid=341
>
> Good luck with your teaching endeavors!
>
> Dave Robinson & Joann Lau
> Biology Department
> Bellarmine University
> 2001 Newburg Road
> Louisville, KY  40205
>
> 502-452-8197
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: plant-ed-bounces from oat.bio.indiana.edu [mailto:
> plant-ed-bounces from oat.bio.indiana.edu] On Behalf Of Jon Monroe
> Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2011 11:47 PM
> To: Plant-ed
> Subject: [Plant-education] First-year plant lab
>
> Hi all,
>
> We're looking for an investigative, multi-week plant lab to use in a
> first-year biology course.  Do you have such a lab that works well and
> that students like?  Our course is called Organisms and it is a walk
> through the nodes of the phylogenetic tree, so it isn't a diversity
> course, but it isn't heavily cellular either.  Thanks!
>
> Jon
>
> --
> Jonathan Monroe, Professor
> Department of Biology
> 820 Madison Dr.  MSC 7801
> James Madison University
> Harrisonburg, VA 22807
> 540-568-6649, http://www.jmu.edu/biology/
>
>
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>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Thu, 21 Jul 2011 06:37:07 -0500
> From: Martha Phillips <mmphillips from stkate.edu>
> Subject: Re: [Plant-education] First-year plant lab
> To: "Robinson, Dr. David" <drobinson from bellarmine.edu>
> Cc: "Lau, Dr. Joann" <jlau from bellarmine.edu>,     Plant-ed
>        <Plant-ed from magpie.bio.indiana.edu>
> Message-ID:
>        <CAKUB_Sr5T2GW2vkWirOaHkkk3ponyuwDkTXVuKPieG=o_59hxg from mail.gmail.com
> >
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
>
> Dear Jon and others -
>
> I have found Fast Plants projects to be a good way to do both experimental
> design and have students learn about growth and development of plants -
> plus
> they take up less space than other types of plant growth projects.  (Though
> they need high light - we've constructed light banks for countertops using
> PVC pipe that work well).
>
> Martha
> --
> ***************************
> Martha M. Phillips, Ph.D.
> Professor of Biology
> Core Director Team
> St. Catherine University
> 2004 Randolph Avenue
> St. Paul, MN 55105
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
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> End of Plant-ed Digest, Vol 71, Issue 3
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