gardening ethics? (was: Domestication of Poison Ivy)

Bob Wildfong bobw at csg.uwaterloo.ca
Mon Nov 16 12:13:36 EST 1992


In article <BxqLJq.Dvv at usenet.ucs.indiana.edu> delwiche at sunflower.bio.indiana.edu (Charles Delwiche) writes:
>
> [Sad story about a feud between deer-people and tree-people, in which
>  both sides suffered losses and each thought that their loss was more
>  significant than the other's]
>
>Now, I can't even begin to express how silly I think this is.  It is
>hard for me to even comprehend this sort of thought.  It brings to
>mind images of a sort of a holy war between herbivores and the herbs.
>You can't go set up birth control clinics for deer, and there are a
>LOT of deer, so the cost of managing the herds is a significant
>concern.  I can't get away from the thought that it is hard to make a
>go of it in this world if you don't have big brown eyes.

The most frustrating thing for those of us who identify with plants is that
people DO have big brown eyes and so do animals.  Plants don't.
The public will always identify much more strongly with animals than they
will with plants because a plant can't look at you while you injure/kill it.
That's also the reason why there are no centipede, toadstool or jellyfish
rights activists.

We are all animals, and we naturally sympathize with our own kind (or at least
our own taxonomic family), so a common, ordinary deer is always more important
in the public eye than a rare tree.

Can you detect my bias in the tone of my typing?


Bob Wildfong                                       bobw at csg.uwaterloo.ca
Waterloo, Ontario                                  bobw at csg.waterloo.edu



More information about the Plantbio mailing list