TEN THINGS I DON'T KNOW ABOUT PLANTS

Ray Dobert rdobert at NALUSDA.GOV
Mon Apr 25 13:41:49 EST 1994


Mark,

At first I was reading this message and thinking to myself "boy, this 
sounds like a really great way to design a course,  innovative and 
creative, maybe even eye-cathing to students."  then I looked at the 
FROM: line and thought "maholland, that couldn't be Mark Holland, late of 
Missouri could it?  Coming up with such innovative ideas?  Mark always 
was creative,  hmm maybe it is the same Mark."  Sure enough it appears that 
it is!

How are things over on the Eastern shore ?  I'm located across the Bay in 
Beltsville at the Nat'l Ag. Library.  Actually seen Mary P. and Ed Coe a 
little while back here.  Let me know if you ever make it over here.

Now, back to your question.  One thing that has always intrigued me 
(especially in the spring) is how plants can sense the environment (light 
temperature) so well that they start growing at precisely the right time 
(usually) to maximize their use of the warm weather/long days.  SO 
basically, and I don't know if this is an unanswered question, where do 
the light (phytochrome) signals and temperature signals come together to 
affect plant growth?

Best of luck with your course,  your students should consider themselves 
lucky. Cheers!

Ray
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Raymond C. Dobert, Ph.D.                       voice: (301)-504-5340      |
| Coordinator, Biotechnology Information Center    Fax: (301)-504-7098      |
| Natl. Agricultural Library - USDA             email: rdobert at nalusda.gov  | 
| 10301 Baltimore Blvd.                                biotech at nalusda.gov  |
| Beltsville, MD  20705-2351  USA                                           |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+



On 23 Apr 1994 maholland at sae.ssu.umd.edu wrote:

> I'M PLANNING A COURSE ENTITLED "TEN THINGS I DON'T KNOW ABOUT PLANTS".  THE
> PHILOSOPHY BEHIND THE COURSE IS THAT PLANT BIOLOGY SHOULD BE PRESENTED IN A WAY THAT EMPHASIZES THAT THERE IS STILL A LOT WE DON'T KNOW ABOUT PLANTS.  THE
> COURSE WILL FOCUS ON TEN BIG THINGS (QUESTIONS) THAT REMAIN UNKNOWN AND GO ABOUTPRESENTING THE BACKGROUND INFORMATION NECESSARY FOR STUDENTS TO REALLY      
> UNDERSTAND WHERE "KNOWN" STOPS AND "UNKNOWN" BEGINS IN PLANT SCIENCE.  THE
> COURSE WILL BE TARGETED AT UNDERGRADUATES, BUT COULD WORK  EFFECTIVELY AT ANY
> LEVEL.  PLEASE HELP!!!!!   I'D LIKE TO KNOW WHAT "UNKNOWNS" WOULD BE INCLUDED
> ON YOUR PERSONAL LIST OF "TEN THINGS I DON'T KNOW".  I WILL SHARE THE FINISHED
> LIST WITH ANY OR ALL INTERESTED (I'LL EVEN POST A SYLLABUS IF YOU LIKE).  THIS
> REQUEST IS BEING MADE TO OTHER PLANT-ORIENTED NEWSGROUPS AS WELL AS THIS ONE, 
> SO I HOPE TO GET A GOOD SAMPLING OF OPINION.  THANKS FOR YOUR HELP.  REPLY
> VIA THIS FORUM OR DIRECTLY TO ME AT "MAHOLLAND at SAE.SSU.UMD.EDU"
> 
> MARK A. HOLLAND
> DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY
> SALISBURY STATE UNIVERSITY
> SALISBURY, MD 21801 USA
> 
> 



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