Help: How does one relocate house plans CT->CO

Gary V. Deutschmann, Sr. raiar at inlink.com
Wed Mar 27 13:04:06 EST 1996


ajack at netcom.com (Adam Jack) wrote:

>Hello,

>I apologize if I am in the wrong group -- I realize this isn't
>quite an issue of plant biology. However I could find no group
>more appropriate.

>I am seeking help in finding out how to relocate plants from Connecticut
>to Colorado. I have interest in all issues, including plant care and
>even altitude differences, but my main problem is the physical
>relocation. 

>The problem is that I can not drive them myself.

>I am told that the mover may not take them. It it up to the discretion
>of the driver. I find that hard to accept since I am so attached to
>these plants that I don't want to take a risk with them.

>I spoke to the Dept of Agriculture who said that there is a possibility
>that a CT representative might be able to provide me with a 'certificate
>of inspection' -- however I still have no guarantees. (The DOA said that
>this was still a bit pointless since the only states to have border
>inspections are Florida, Arizona and California -- none of which are to
>be crossed.)

>Does anybody know who I might achieve this goal? Are there specialized
>plant relocating firms? 

>Any thoughts welcome and much appreciated,

>Regards,

>Adam
>-- 
>--
>+1-303-642-1306 | http://www.micrognosis.com/~ajack/index.html

You can package them in wax lined cartons, available from most of the
larger greenhouses.  Water them well two days before packing and then
leave the tops open until just before they will be loaded into the
moving van.  If the temperature is above or below dangerous (for the
plants) have them load the boxes in the center of the moving van for
insulation purposes.

Upon unloading at your new home, open the top of the boxes as soon as
you can to allow air to get to the plant.  When the temperature of
your new home is up to normal, and the plants have had time to
stabalize to this new temperature, you can then unpack them from the
cartons.  They should fair quite fine.  Certain species will more than
likely drop several leaves in protest against the move, but should
recover without further problems.

TTUL
Gary






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