BEN # 198

Adolf Ceska aceska at VICTORIA.TC.CA
Sat Jul 18 01:28:46 EST 1998


                                                   
BBBBB    EEEEEE   NN   N             ISSN 1188-603X
BB   B   EE       NNN  N             
BBBBB    EEEEE    NN N N             BOTANICAL
BB   B   EE       NN  NN             ELECTRONIC
BBBBB    EEEEEE   NN   N             NEWS

No. 198                              July 17, 1998

aceska at victoria.tc.ca                Victoria, B.C.
-----------------------------------------------------------
 Dr. A. Ceska, P.O.Box 8546, Victoria, B.C. Canada V8W 3S2
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GRASSES OF THE TRIBE HORDEAE IN NORTH AMERICA: 2. KEY
From: Mary Barkworth <stipoid at cc.usu.edu>

The  key does not include intergeneric hybrids. They can usually
be detected by their intermediate morphology and  sterility.  In
sterile  plants  the  anthers are indehiscent, somewhat pointed;
and tend to remain on the plant. Measurements of  rachis  inter-
nodes and spikelets should be made at mid-spike.

1. Spikelets 2-7 at all or most nodes of the inflorescence

   2. Spikelets  3  at  each  node,  each  spikelet  with only 1
      floret, the  florets  of  the  lateral  spikelets  usually
      sterile and reduced
      .................................................  Hordeum

   2. Spikelets  usually not 3 at each node but, if so, at least
      the central spikelet with more than 1 floret

      3. Plants annual; spikelets paired, with  2  florets  each
         but only the first floret fertile; glumes 5-80 mm long,
         awn-like; lemmas awned, the awns 20-110 mm long, diver-
         gent and often cernuous at maturity
         .........................................  Taeniatherum

      3. Plants  perennial; spikelets 2-7 per node, usually with
         2 or more fertile florets; glumes various; lemmas awned
         or unawned, if  awned,  the  awn  up  to  80  mm  long,
         straight,  ascending  or  divergent,  but  usually  not
         cernuous, at maturity

         4. Glumes 4-18 mm long, subulate  to  narrowly  lanceo-
            late,  0-1-  veined  at midlength; anthers 2.5-10 mm
            long

            5. Ligules 0.2-0.3 mm long;  plants  cespitose;  in-
               florescence  a  spike  with  2 or 3 spikelets per
               node
               ................................  Psathyrostachys

            5. Ligules  0.3-8  mm  long;  plants  cespitose   or
               rhizomatous;  inflorescence  usually a spike with
               1-7 spikelets per node, sometimes a panicle
               .........................................  Leymus

         4. Glumes flat and with 3 or more  veins  at  midlength
            or,  if  subulate and 1-veined, shorter than 4 mm or
            longer than 18 mm; anthers 1-9 mm long

            6. Plants rhizomatous; anthers  3-9  mm  long;  leaf
               blades   prominently  ribbed,  the  ribs  closely
               packed; plants  of  coastal  or  inland  beaches,
               sometimes cultivated
               .........................................  Leymus

            6. Plants  cespitose; anthers 1-3 mm long; plants of
               many habitats but not on beaches
               .........................................  Elymus

1. Spikelets solitary at all, or almost all, nodes  of  the  in-
   florescence

   7. Rachis  internodes  0.2-5  mm long; spikelets usually more
      than 3 times the length of the internodes, usually diverg-
      ing

      8. Plants annual; spikes 0.8-2 cm long
         ...........................................  Eremopyrum

      8. Plants perennial; spikes 1.5-15 cm long
         ............................................  Agropyron

   7. Rachis internodes 3-25 mm long; spikelets  1-3  times  the
      length of the internodes, often appressed or ascending

      9. Glumes  with  2  prominent keels, each bearing tufts of
         hair; not established
         ............................................  Dasypyrum

      9. Glumes usually unkeeled or with 1 keel, never  both  2-
         keeled and with tufts of hair on the keel

         10. Glumes subulate to narrowly lanceolate, stiff, 0-1-
             veined at midlength, shorter than the spikelets but
             at least one glume more than 5 mm long

             11. Lemmas  with  a conspicuously scabrous awn, the
                 awns 7-50 mm long, straight
                 .......................................  Secale

             11. Lemmas unawned or with a scabridulous awn up to
                 7 mm long

                 12. Glumes lanceolate, tapering to an acuminate
                     tip from near midlength or below,  slightly
                     curved   to   one   side  apically;  plants
                     rhizomatous
                     ...............................  Pascopyrum

                 12. Glumes  subulate  from   near   the   base,
                     straight; plants cespitose or rhizomatous
                     ...................................  Leymus

         10. Glumes  usually  ovate, rectangular, or lanceolate,
             if subulate, both glumes less than  5  mm  or  more
             than 18 mm long

             13. Glumes  flexible,  acute  to  awned or subulate
                 throughout

                 14. Spikelets distant,  scarcely  reaching  the
                     base  of  the  spikelet  immediately above;
                     anthers 4-8 mm long;  plants  cespitose  or
                     shortly rhizomatous
                     ..........................  Pseudoroegneria

                 14. Spikelets   more  closely  spaced,  usually
                     reaching at least midlength of the spikelet
                     immediately above; anthers 0.5-7  mm  long;
                     plants cespitose or rhizomatous
                     ...................................  Elymus

             13. Glumes   usually  stiff,  truncate  or  obtuse,
                 sometimes awned or with short,  thick,  lateral
                 teeth

                 15. Plants    perennial;    glumes    sometimes
                     mucronate but never awned or  with  lateral
                     teeth
                     ...............................  Thinopyrum

                 15. Plants  annual;  glumes  often with lateral
                     veins   or   awns,   the   midvein   smooth
                     throughout

                     16. Glumes rounded
                         .............................  Aegilops

                     16. Glumes keeled
                         .............................  Triticum


PACIFIC FORESTRY CENTRE, VICTORIA, B.C.: HERBARIUM WEB PAGE
From: "Callan, Brenda" <bcallan at PFC.Forestry.CA>

Thanks  to the computer expertise of Dr. Alan Thomson, and co-op
student Jonathan Bahl, (and about five years of  data  entry  by
various  people)  our  herbarium databases are now accessible on
our web page:

http://www.pfc.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/biodiversity/herbarium/

Included here are two databases of interest:

1) BC Host-Fungus Index

The BC Host-Fungus Index was compiled from 60 years of  Canadian
Forest  Service  records,  augmented  from  published literature
records and data  generously  provided  by  Agriculture/Agrifood
Canada. The Host-Fungus Index has been designed to assist in the
identification  and  formal  documentation of fungi occurring on
native plants in the province  of  British  Columbia,  with  the
exception  of most agricultural crops and horticultural ornamen-
tal (non-native) plant species. The Index  contains  records  of
3481  fungus species on 1710 different plant hosts. Over 4690 of
these records are verified by herbarium specimens curated at the
Pacific Forestry Centre.

2) Herbarium Accession Database

The Herbarium Voucher Specimen  database  documents  records  of
over  20,000  specimens  housed  in  DAVFP, the Forest Pathology
Herbarium at the Pacific Forestry Centre.

The Forest Pathology Herbarium at the Canadian Forest  Service's
Pacific Forestry Centre is an internationally recognized collec-
tion  of  over  35,300 preserved and catalogued forest fungi and
disease specimens,  representing  over  3,000  different  fungal
species.  Its abbreviation in the Index Herbariorum, a catalogue
of the world's herbaria, is DAVFP  (Department  of  Agriculture,
Victoria,  Forest  Pathology). DAVFP, as illustrated by its very
name, has existed through  a  number  of  departmental  changes,
growing,  but  maintaining  its  continuity  over  50 years. The
majority of DAVFP collections were made by rangers and  research
scientists  affiliated  with  the  now  defunct  Canadian Forest
Service Forest Insect  and  Disease  Survey  over  40  years  of
regular  monitoring  for forest pests throughout the Pacific and
Yukon Region. The Pacific  Forestry  Centre  still  maintains  a
strong  commitment  to  maintain  and expand the current collec-
tions, with greater emphasis on fungal biodiversity research.


ILLUSTRATIONS OF VASCULAR PLANTS OF NORTHEASTERN US & CANADA

Illustrated companion to Gleason and Cronquist's Manual:
   Illustrations of the vascular plants of  northeastern  United
   States  and  adjacent  Canada. Edited by N.H. Holmgren & col-
   laborators. New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY.  xvi+937 p.
   1998 ISBN 0-89327-399-6 [hardcover] Price: US$125.00

   Ordering information:
   The  New York Botanical Garden Press, 200th Street & Southern
   Blvd., Bronx, NY 10458-5126;  Fax:  (718)817-8842;  To  place
   telephone  orders,  call: (718) 817-8721. If you have ordered
   from NYBG in the past  and  have  your  current  credit  card
   number  &  expiration  date on file (MasterCard & VISA only),
   you may send orders via e-mail to scipubs at nybg.org   (Do  not
   send credit card numbers via e-mail!)

   See also NYBG Scientific Publications Department Catalogue:
   http://www.nybg.org/bsci/spub/catl/CATAL2.html#NAF

This  is  a  beautiful book of line drawings of about 4,400 vas-
cular plant species growing in the  northeastern  United  States
and  adjacent  Canada. This book accentuates the artistic beauty
of perfect botanical illustrations and for people not interested
in botany this is a  great  collection  of  botanical  art.  For
botanists,  this  is  the  most  useful aid in identification of
plants of northeastern United States, a  powerful  companion  to
Gleason  and  Cronquist's  Manual.  This is a great book and the
MUST for everybody who is interested in North American plants or
in the art of botanical illustration.

Drawings in this book were selected from the  original  drawings
for  the "New Britton and Brown Illustrated Flora" to which more
than 300 species  illustrations  were  added.  Each  species  is
illustrated  with  a  general view (habit, flowering or fruiting
twig, etc.) and  drawings  of  important  details  are  attached
whenever they can help with the identification.

The price of this book is high, but it is fair when you consider
the  high  quality  of the paper and the print. The book makes a
perfect gift, and even if you cannot find a donor, you can  give
it to yourself. My only complaint is with the title of the book.
It is too dry for this apotheosis of the beauty of plants.


RE: BEN 196 - ALNUS RUBRA HYBRIDIZATION
From: Jim Pojar <Jim.Pojar at gems3.gov.bc.ca>

If anyone ever wants to pursue further the hybridization between
Alnus  rubra  and A. tenuifolia, the Skeena River valley between
Terrace and  Hazelton  should  be  investigated.  Alder  hybrids
appear  to  be  common,  much  as the classic swarm of Picea. It
would make a good M.Sc. topic.


IN MEMORIAM


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