Genetic engineering is a Good Thing?

Beverly Erlebacher bae at cs.toronto.edu
Wed Oct 7 12:44:28 EST 1998


In article <+rGKXCAxCqG2Ew1p at upthorpe.demon.co.uk>,
Oz  <Oz at upthorpe.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>In article <6vdu4m$moj$1 at nnrp1.dejanews.com>, irv4vz0c at my-dejanews.com
>writes
>
>>> >Agent Orange,
>>>
>>Ever heard of Vietnam??
>
>Certainly. But deaths due to AO?

One of he worst legacies of the Vietnam war is the very high incidence of
children born with limb defects and neurological abnormalities after their
parents were exposed to Agent Orange.  Dioxins and other congeners are both
mutagenic and teratogenic.  They break down slowly, so people in areas heavily
dosed with Agent Orange continued to be exposed to them for years afterwards.
How many seriously disabled people do you think a subsistance farming village
can support?

>>> >and probably at least a few other "properly
>>> >handled" pesticides have all caused the deaths of many,

The incidence of leukemias and other cancers has increased remarkably in
US corn and grain farmers and their families over the past 20-30 years, 
out of proportion to the incidence of these cancers in other rural residents 
or the population as a whole.

A survey of veterinarians found that pet dogs are four times more likely
to get leukemia if they belong to families that use commercial lawn services
to spray their lawns with pesticides on a regular basis.  It's too hard to
gather data on the children who play on the lawns with the dogs, however.




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