Genetically modified crops - February issue

Wayne Parrott wparrott at uga.cc.uga.edu
Sat Feb 6 11:11:01 EST 1999


>
> present or greater density. Present intensive agriculture is blamed for
> drop in number of some birds: presumably GM rops will continue this
> trend?

You might be right at the level of a farm, but on a large scale, there is
another way to look at it.  Right now, the world has about 6 million square
miles of land under cultivation.  If our crop yields were still what they
were 40 years, ago, we would need to cultivate about 15 million square
miles to produce the current food supply.  Some of the land that has not
had to be cultivated continues to serve as wildlife habitat.  Thus, to the
extent that high-yield agriculture makes it unnecessary to put additional
land into production, more wildlife habitat remains available.
Furthermore, in the US, we have even been able to take land *out* of
production due to the advent of high-yield agriculture.

> Now, pehaps _you_ can explain to me why GM is, apparently, totally
> irrelevant to birdwatching?
> --
> Gnome 11




More information about the Plantbio mailing list