Genetically modified crops - February issue

Wayne Parrott wparrott at uga.cc.uga.edu
Sun Feb 7 11:45:35 EST 1999


>
> Alternatively, without increased agricultural production the human
> population would have stabilised at a lower level. Few if any areas of
> true 'wilderness', but many, many more suitable for wildlife that was
> able to adapt to a less intensive agricultural regime.
>

I am not sure I agree.  I have travelled extensively in the developing world.
What I have seen is that environmentally sensitive areas are invaded and
destroyed before human reproduction stops.   The instict to feed onself and one's
family and to reproduce is inmeasurable.

> The rate of agricultural production in UK/Europe has also allowed land
> to be taken out of production. A marvellous idea in principle - what a
> shame that in the area in which I live (and probably many others), the
> annual set-aside is nonetheless sprayed off in May to stop weeds and
> volunteers from setting seed, thus greatly reducing its value to
> wildlife. Long-term set-aside is generally treated as ley, but there's
> not a lot of that about here.

Sounds like an issue to take up with the local politicians.



>
> --
> Remove duplicate. to reply.
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> 'Do not fear death so much, but rather the inadequate life'
>                                             Bertolt Brecht




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