Are there "Identical Twin" plants?

Wayne Parrott wparrott at uga.edu
Sun Dec 17 15:19:27 EST 2000


ereoid wrote:

> Sorry but you are mistaken. The "Dandelion" is not an asexually clonally
> propagated species. It reproduces from seeds. Seeds are propagated sexually
> by definition.

Wrong.  Recheck your definition. It is possible to get seed without sex-- we
call that apomixis.

> It is apomictic but does show some variation in its offspring. Why should
> you assume its offspring are genetically identical?

If the apomixis is facultative, the seed will be a mixture of sexual seed and
apomictic seed.



>
>
> An asexually propagated species is one propagated from offsets, division or
> tissue culture.
>
> "George Hammond" <ghammond at mediaone.net> wrote in message
> news:3A3B153B.76E10241 at mediaone.net...
> > Cereoid wrote:
> > >
> > > Cloned plants would genetically identical. One can theoretically raise
> an
> > > INFINITE number of genetically identical plants. Mind boggling, isn't
> it? It
> > > is being done all the time.
> >
> >
> > GH:  no kidding... thanks for the info.
> >
> > >
> > > The rest depends on how they were raised. Genetically identical plants
> grown
> > > under different conditions may outwardly look different.
> > >
> >
> > GH:  I understand it depends on what part the plant started from in the
> >      case of fragmentation etc.
> > However, in the case of some well organized "spore" bearing
> >      asexual plants, they should all look pretty much the same... like
> >      Dandelions for instance. (A Dandelion is an asexual plant if
> >      I'm not mistaken).
> >        Now, it's pretty noticeable on your lawn that some Dandelions get
> >      a lot larger than others at maturity.  If we assume that they are all
> >      genetically IDENTICAL (or arranged it so), then this would tell us
> >      something about the effect of the "average environment" on Dandelion
> >      growth, would it not?  I mean, we could compute a mean and a
> >      standard deviation for the height and weight of an ensemble
> >      of "genetically identical" Dandelions... isn't this so?  This would
> >      tell us how much the "environmental variance" was.
> >
> > > The old nature verses nurture argument?
> > >
> >
> > GH:  Yes sir.... big time.  The thesis here, is that there is such a
> >      thing as a "universal environmental growth curve deficit" for, in
> > effect,
> >      every living thing on the planet.  Of course, you have to "eliminate
> >      the genetic component" first, to measure it.  Seems to me, from what
> >      I've heard.... agriculturists must ALREADY KNOW the answer
> >      to this question, at least for specific asexual crops... and
> >      probably know it to 2-decimal places.  I'd like to find out
> >      what it is.
> >
> >      You have no idea how important this is.  Scientists now suspect
> >      that this "universal growth curve deficit" in humans (see:
> >
> > http://people.ne.mediaone.net/ghammond/growth5.JPG
> >
> >      is actually the scientific explanation of "God", because of it's
> >      impact on the brain.
> >        Identical Twin studies are used extensively in Psychology as
> >      you know.  But now it is suspected that this "growth curve deficit"
> >      actually exists in every living thing... and the first thing to look
> >      at would be Plants... where, interestingly, the genetic component
> >      can apparently be ENTIRELY ELIMINATED, unlike the case for the
> >      higher animals because of sexual reproduction.
> >       Any further info on asexual crop measurements... such as
> >       the "standard deviation in crop yield per acre" for identical
> >       plants, would be of the keenest interest.
> >
> >
> > --
> > BE SURE TO VISIT MY WEBSITE, BELOW:
> > -----------------------------------------------------------
> > George Hammond, M.S. Physics
> > Email:    ghammond at mediaone.net
> > Website:  http://people.ne.mediaone.net/ghammond/index.html
> > -----------------------------------------------------------






More information about the Plantbio mailing list