C3-plant and C4-plant

dave florian.knorr at web.de
Sat Jul 28 14:01:14 EST 2001


Thanks

"Moll McCarty" <mollymc at wi.rr.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:H0m87.1330$ul5.152433 at typhoon.kc.rr.com...
> The CO2 available for photosynthesis outside of a sealed environment, in
> most situations where any plant grows, is unlimited. The CO2 available in
> this sealed environment is limited to start with. And lessens the more
that
> photosynthesis occurs. It is THE limiting factor towards growth in this
> situation.  Apply that thought to the specifics of C3 & C4 metabolism.
> I'm trying to, but it's getting a bit muddled after this.
> The extra heat of a sealed environment may play into this, too. Higher the
> heat, the faster the chemical reactions. C3s are slow but sure, C4s are
> faster in heat, hence, our weeds come up first, then the flowers.
> Extra heat will also open the breathing pores of the leaves. These stomata
> are busy respirating, giving off O2, and NOT gathering in CO2. No CO2, no
> photosynthesis because no carbon.
> Yours in progress,
> Moll
> > > dave <florian.knorr at web.de> wrote in message
> > > news:9jsad8$dvi$06$1 at news.t-online.com...
> > > > Hi!
> > > >
> > > > I´ve recently heard of following experiment:
> > > > If you cultivat a C3-plant and a C4-plant together in an airtight
> glassy
> > > > container, the C3-plant will die after a short period of time.
> > > > Could anybody explain to me for what reason / reasons the C3-plant
> will
> > > die.
> > > >
> > > > Thanks in advance!





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