C3-plant and C4-plant

Moll McCarty mollymc at wi.rr.com
Mon Jul 30 12:07:53 EST 2001


I have found a referent to such an experiment in the book _Horitcultural
Sciences_, by Jules Janick, 4th ed, p. 115.
Moll

"philcorbett" <philcorbett at ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:N8c97.43595$SK6.5461612 at news6-win.server.ntlworld.com...
> We also need to know the growing media. Moist warm organic compost would
be
> a source of CO2 and possible pathogens.
> Phil.
> "Cereoid*" <cereoid at prodigy.net> wrote in message
> news:yi_87.4908$2v1.1004094687 at newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...
> > This is not some hypothetical "thought experiment".
> >
> > This is either some real experiment using actual plant species or a pure
> > hoax.
> >
> > Do you see the difference?
> >
> >
> > David Kirschtel <kirschte at msu.edu> wrote in message
> > news:3B6462E0.AD841BBD at msu.edu...
> >
> >
> > Cereoid* wrote:
> > >
> > > Pure speculation.
> > >
> > > Its worthless without one being able to refer back to the actual
> > experiment
> > > itself, if it really existed, or being able to duplicate it.
> > >
> > > We still do not know where was it published or which species were
used.
> > >
> >
> > Sorry Cereoid, we need none of the above. Einstein's greatest
> > contribution to science was the _Gedanken_Experiment_ ("Thought
> > Experiment") and that's sufficient for our purposes here. So, let's
> > continue....
> >
> > The problem is, paradoxically, O2 concentration not CO2 and is the
> > result of photorespiration. RUBISCO has an affinity for O2 as well as
> > CO2. If O2 is bound to RuBP then it is oxidized, with CO2 being lost
> > from the Calvin-Benson cycle. This can result in a 20-50% loss of fixed
> > C from the plant in "normal" conditions.
> >
> > This is considered to be the selective force for the evolution C4
> > photosynthesis. C4 plants have spatially separated the O2-producing
> > Light Reactions from the C-fixing Dark Reactions of photosynthesis and
> > thus minimized/reduced the C-fixing inefficiency of photorespiration.
> >
> > So, in a sealed container with (presumptively) high O2 concentrations
> > the C3 plant would starve to death for lack of carbon. Meanwhile, the C4
> > plant would be "cannibalizing" the CO2 being lost from the C3 plant as a
> > result of photorespiration.
> >
> >
> > Original Question:
> > > I´ve recently heard of following experiment:
> > > If you cultivat a C3-plant and a C4-plant together in an airtight
> > > glassy container, the C3-plant will die after a short period of time.
> > > Could anybody explain to me for what reason / reasons the C3-plant
> > > will die.
> >
> >
> > --
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >   David Kirschtel, Ph.D. * kirschte at pilot.msu.edu * 517.432.0898
> >     112 N Kedzie Lab * Mich State Univ * E Lansing, MI * 48824
> >  First Year Online/Biology http://lecture.lite.msu.edu/~bio/fyol/
> >          [after 17 Sept: Biology Program, Hitchcock Hall,
> >        Univ. of Washington, Seattle WA, 98150 206.543.9120]
> >
> >
>
>





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