Plants for Chicago area

Beverly Erlebacher bae at cs.toronto.edu
Wed Mar 28 11:42:57 EST 2001


In article <20010325071521.22059.00000782 at ng-cl1.aol.com>,
Muzziestuie <muzziestuie at aol.com> wrote:
>HI ALL
>   Could someone advise me some plants to grow in an area just out of
>Chicago.Its a small farm and they would like some advice.What zone is it
>in?Also Spruce trees what is the best propagation method?
>   Im a Horticulturist but half a world away so after local knowledge.
>      THANKYOU
>       STUIE
>         AUSTRALIA

If your friends want to make money from their small farm, they should
realize that without several of: a lot of capital, specialized
knowledge, an ability and desire to work insanely long hours at minimal
recompense, excellent marketing skills and a heck of a lot of luck,
they are further ahead putting their money in a savings account.  See
story below.

If they just want to enjoy living in the country, raising some of their
own food and growing ornamental plants for pleasure and maybe a little
spending money, they should visit a public library and look through
some of the innumerable books on gardening in a temperate continental
climate.  Most US books have zone maps.  In the Chicago area their
climate zone will depend on their proximity to Lake Michigan.  They can
also look around and see what other people in their area are growing.

I believe it's still the case in the US that there is a county
agriculture extension office that people can go to for advice and
government publications.  In some jurisdictions, one can buy young
trees for reforestation from the governement for minimal cost.  Spruces
are commonly used for this purpose.  In their area, reforestation
probably includes windbreaks and shelterbelts.

Story:  Some guys are sitting around talking about what they would do
if they won a million dollars in the lottery.  The usual things get
mentioned: buy a nice house, car, boat, travel around the world, put
the kids through college, retire early, etc.  But one guy, a farmer,
doesn't say anything until his friends ask him.  Then he replies:
"Well, I guess I'll just keep on farming until it's all gone."




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