Carnivorous plants questions.

Patrick D. Rockwell hnhc85a at prodigy.net
Fri Aug 30 14:23:22 EST 2002


"Cereoid+10" <cereoid at prodigy.net> wrote in message
news:_JOb9.55$TK.4332781 at newssvr16.news.prodigy.com...
> None-the-less, what you read as a child about man eating plants is
> completely fictitious from badly written SCI-FI and does nothing toward
> understanding or appreciating genuine carnivorous plants. Trying to find
out
> more about a plant that doesn't exist is a waste of time. The real thing
is
> far more interesting.
>

[sigh!]  >|-(       Ok, one last time. The book that I saw the plant in was
a SCIENCE BOOK, NOT a SCIENCE FICTION book. And I only compared the look of
the plant to a tv depiction of a man-eating plant. The SCIENCE BOOK in
question described the plant as being an insectivorous plant from Ceylon
(Now Sri Lanka).


> Like the Walrus said, There is the parrot pitcher plant from Florida
> (Sarracenia psittacina) but it does not have active traps.
>
> http://www.sarracenia.com/galleria/g252.html
>
> http://www.sarracenia.com/faq.html
>
> BTW, wasn't Paul the walrus?
>
> --
> electric walrus
> Patrick D. Rockwell <hnhc85a at prodigy.net> wrote in message
> news:b5Ob9.35$tB.3812368 at newssvr16.news.prodigy.com...
> >
> > "Cereoid+10" <cereoid at prodigy.net> wrote in message
> > news:papb9.1306$Eu3.72049829 at newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...
> > > If that is what your "Parrot Plant" is, there is no such thing. The
> > Asiatic
> > > species of Nepenthes do not have active traps. You shouldn't watch bad
> > > science fiction movies, they have really badly made "man-eating
plants"
> > and
> > > really bad science advice written by hack writers. Someone your age
> should
> > > know better. The reality of carnivorous plants is far more
interesting.
> > >
> >
> > I didn't say that I believe in man eating plants, or in what I see in
> > science fiction/fantasy/horror, nor did I say anything about taking
advice
> > from hack writers. My reference to man eating plants in the
> > sci-fi/fantasy/horror genre was only a comparison to the photo that I
saw
> in
> > the science book.I know that I read about this.
> > I was wrong about the country when I said Madagascar, and for all I
know,
> I
> > could be wrong about the name "Parrot Plant" but I'm sure that is what I
> > read.
> >
> > > BTW, Ceylon is now Sri Lanka.
> > >
> > Thanks for the correction. :-)
> >
> > >
> > > Patrick D. Rockwell <prockwell at thegrid.net> wrote in message
> > > news:fc427bc9.0208281443.16646886 at posting.google.com...
> > > > paghatSPAMMERS-DIE at netscape.net (paghat) wrote in message
> > > news:<paghatSPAMMERS-DIE-2608021415010001 at soggy72.drizzle.com>...
> > > > > In article <Wnva9.223$kX5.21887183 at newssvr17.news.prodigy.com>,
> > "Patrick
> > > > > D. Rockwell" <hnhc85a at prodigy.net> wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > I know about 5 basic kinds of carnivorous plants. Venus fly
traps,
> > > Pitcher
> > > > > > plants, Sundews, Butterworts, & Bladderworts. Are there others?
I
> > > don't mean
> > > > > > subspecies of the abve, like different types of Sundews or
Pitcher
> > > plants. I
> > > > > > heard that there is something called the Madagascar Parrot plant
> > which
> > > is
> > > > > > insectivorous. Does anyone know about this? Where can I get the
> > > information.
> > > > > > What about the Century plant. Is that carnivorous? Thanks in
> advance
> > > for the
> > > > > > information.
> > > > >
> > > > > I never heard of carniverous Century plant (Agave sp), nor a
> > carniverous
> > > > > Parrot Plant; but my not hearing of them doesn't mean much.
Several
> > > > > epiphytic succulents like the Century Plant may in fact feed on
> > insects
> > > > >[snip]
> > > >
> > > > I just remembered something! When I first read about the carnivorous
> > > > Parrot Plant, I read it in a science book in 1967 when I was eleven
> > > > years old. But I think that it wasn't from Madagascar, but from
> > > > Ceylon! Any carnivorous plants there? I saw a picture in this
science
> > > > book which looked like a wide bird beak sitting on the ground ready
to
> > > > snap shut on anything that stepped into it. :-) A bit remensicent of
> > > > some of the man-eating plants that you might have seen depicted in
> > > > various sci-fi, horror, fantasy films. As for the Century Plant, I
> > > > recently saw an old black & white move called "The Thing From
Another
> > > > World", in which one of the characters discussed intelligence in
> > > > animals, and said that the Century Plant could trap insects and
small
> > > > rodents to digest them, but I guess that's not true. :-)
> > > >
> > > > -Patrick-
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>





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