Need help re: Broken Evergreen Branch - thanks

Gene Newcomb newcombg at science.oregonstate.edu
Mon Sep 30 12:52:13 EST 2002


You're always going to have a weak spot at the point where the idiots made the
cut, so if at all possible I would suggest making a cut now rather than have it
break later. If it is juniper it may not send out shoots below the cut, but some
other evergreens will regularly resprout.

Otherwise, your repair method will work, but you must be careful and watch the
ties to see that they don't bind the plant in such a way as to limit transport
of  water to the green part of the branch. Bonsai growers sometimes cut a groove
in a branch and lay a wire (in this case perhaps a rebar?) in it and then bind
the branch with raffia which will naturally deteriorate in one or two seasons.
In any case, I would think that another Japanese technique would be worthwhile.
Find a forked stick of the right length and use it for a prop even if you do
use  your broomstick technique. If no forked sticks are available, tie three
sticks together near their top and spread the base to make a three-legged
support. It may not be the most attractive thing in the world, but it will help
to support a weakened branch.

Gene Newcomb
Oregon State University

James McCoughlin wrote:

> Hi all,   (I apologize if this message already came through before, if so,
> please reply to this one instead, thanks)
>
>   On a recent visit to my parents house, I've noticed that their latest
> tree/bush trimming project has been a disaster.  To make a long story short,
> they paid for a horrible service.
>
> Anyway, on the Juniper(?) Evergreen Shrub, a large "very crucial" branch was
> damaged and needs to be repaired (I'd rather not remove, it would make the
> bush look completely horrible, if I would have to cut it off.
>
>  ->  It turned out that their service people for some reason put a 45 degree
> cut into the branch, and appears to very susceptible to breaking off in ice
> or snow.
>   * The branch and leaves are still alive and growing, but I would like to
> straighten out this branch, and secure it to make it withstand extra weight
> with a broomstick, and tie it together with those really strong plastic
> ties.  Is this a good idea?  Does anyone else have any other/better ideas?
> ANY help would be much appreciated!
>
> If I've made details above confusing, please see a picture of this branch
> and a diagram of what I've been planning to do at:
>     http://www.fourbes.com/branch.gif ( www.fourbes.com/branch.gif )
>
> Thanks very much everyone!!
> JMC




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