Need advice on New England trees

bae at cs.toronto.no-uce.edu.yyz bae at cs.toronto.no-uce.edu.yyz
Thu Jul 15 19:04:55 EST 2004


In article <10f9m2shkifuef1 at corp.supernews.com>,
Theodore Perrotti <tedp at intergate.com> wrote:
>Hi.  I'm an author writing a fiction story set in the forests of New England
>in the USA.  For a certain scene, I need to involve a species of tree that:
>
>1.  Has fruit on it in June,
>2.  (Sometimes) has that fruit on branches that are at least 15' off the
>ground,
>3.  Is native to New England (especially Connecticut).
>
>Do any of you know of such a species?  If not, do you know where I might
>find that information?
>
>I'll appreciate any help you can give me.

Amelanchier spp, called juneberries, serviceberries, shadberries, shadblow,
and a good bit further west, saskatoons.  They are related to apples, but
look and taste more like blueberries, sort of.  Anyhow, it's a forest-edge
or open forest understory small tree or tall bush.  There are a lot of
species.  I don't know which are native to New England.  They are often
used in urban landscaping these days, and you can amuse yourself with
the reactions of the passersby if you go pick and eat the pleasant-tasting
fruit off the shrubs in front of public buildings.

Btw, they were used as the fruit component of pemmican, and in areas like
the Canadian prairies where fruit is not easy to grow, improved cultivars
of native species are grown commercially for pies and jam.




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