Detergents

sujoy ghosh sujoy_ghosh at glaxo.com
Thu Mar 21 16:35:46 EST 1996


An alternative to octylglucoside would be CHAPS which is priced at about
half that of OG. If anionic detergents work for you then sodium
cholate/sodium deoxycholate or sodium taurocholate and taurodeoxycholate
may also be worth trying.
Sujoy


In article <nef1002-1902961101070001 at moose.bioc.cam.ac.uk>,
nef1002 at cus.cam.ac.uk (Nick Fisher) wrote:

> In article <4g39rn$u1m at netnews.upenn.edu>, satish at a.chem.upenn.edu (Satish
> Nair) wrote:
> 
> > Hello,
> > 
> > The protein with which I am working requires the presence of NP40 during
> > the purification stage for solubility purposes.  I can rid the detergent
> > from the protein during ion exchange chromatography by displacing it with
> > higher concentrations of a high CMC, nonionic, dialyzable detergent such
> > as betaoctylglucoside.  The problem is that beta-OG costs a ton!!  Does
> > anone have a suitable detergent replacement with similar characateristics
> > (i.e. high CMC, no A280 absorbance, dialyzable, etc.) which does not
> > cost the equivalent of the gross national product of a small country?
> > 
> > Thanks in advance,
> > 
> > satish nair
> 
> A glucamide, such as Mega-8 or Mega-9, often proves an acceptable
> substitute for OG. These are non-ionic detergents with cmcs of about 60
> and 22 mM respectively, with no 280 absorbance. Mega-8/9 are still quite
> pricey (check Sigma catalogue for prices), although nothing like as expensive
> as OG. Another alternative is "Elugent", available from Calbiochem. Elugent
> consists of a mixture of alkyl glucosides (like OG) and is incredibly cheap (
> 50g cost 30 pounds sterling). Of course, as this is a mixture of detergents,
> it doesn't have a cmc as such, although the manufacturers claim it can be
> easily removed by dialysis.
> 
> Hope this helps,
> 
> Nick Fisher
> Biochemistry Dept.
> Cambridge University
> --



More information about the Proteins mailing list