Essential amino acid requirements

Stuart Dunn dunns99 at erols.com
Tue Dec 14 06:17:49 EST 1999


Siemel B. Naran wrote:
> 
> On Mon, 13 Dec 1999 10:33:23 -0600, River Mouse
> 
> >Whey | Soy | Egg | Rice | EAA
> >-----+-----|-----|------|----------
> > 6.8 | 4.3 | 4.5 |  4.2 | L-Isoleucine
> >10.9 | 7.2 | 6.8 |  8.6 | L-Leucine
> > 9.5 | 5.5 | 5.5 |  3.5 | L-Lysine
> > 2.5 | 1.2 | 2.7 |  2.4 | L-Methionine
> > 3.1 | 4.6 |  ?  |  5.2 | L-Phenylalanine
> > 8.3 | 3.3 | 3.6 |  3.6 | L-Threonine
> > 2.0 | 1.1 | 0.9 |  1.3 | L-Tryptophan
> > 6.4 | 4.4 | 5.1 |  4.7 | L-Valine
> 
> And L-Histidine is essential for children.
> 
> But I'm thinking, does the body need an absolute amount of protein everyday
> or an absolute ratio?
> 
> If your body needs a fixed amount everyday, like 2.5 grams of methionine,
> then you could just eats of lots of soy and you'd surely get or exceed the
> minimum requirement of all the proteins.  But through excess, you'd
> overtax your kidneys in getting rid of the nitrogen.
> 
> If your body needs a fixed ratio everyday, like lysine/methionine should
> be 3.8 even though amount of methionine may be 1.5 or 2.5 or 3.5 grams,
> then no amount of soy will satisfy the requirement.
Recent studies show that soy protein does not increase calcium loss, but
animal protein does.
> 
> --
> --------------
> siemel b naran
> --------------



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