plotting enzyme activity

Kyle Legate legatek at mcmail.cis.mcmaster.ca
Mon Jan 6 11:08:01 EST 2003


On 6 Jan 2003 adeboer at chem.vu.nl wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I am an analytical chemist, combining enzymes with analytical instruments. Now I have a question.
> If I will obtain Km and Vmax out of a michealis-menten plot, which type of plot is the best to use, I mean: lineweaver-burk, eadie-hofstee, hanes-woolf, direct linear...?
>
The problem with each of these graphs is that they force data that is
usually non-linear into a linear representation. The consequence of this
is that error becomes greatly magnified, which negatively affects the
accuracy of your calculated parameters. If you have to use a linear method
for calculation, the direct linear method is the best, but the ideal way
of dealing with kinetics these days is to use a computer to fit a curve to
your data so you don't have to force it into a linear model. I found a
discussion of each of the approaches you mention, and their associated
caveats at:
http://www-biol.paisley.ac.uk/kinetics/Chapter_2/contents_chap2.html

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legatek at mcmaster.ca		Kyle Legate            legatek at hotmail.com

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