[Protein-analysis] Re: Denaturation and Digestion

Radium glucegen1 at excite.com
Sat Feb 4 03:40:43 EST 2006


DK wrote:
> In article <1139037632.647317.70470 at g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>, "Radium" <glucegen1 at excite.com> wrote:
> >Hi:
> >
> >When a protein denatures, it loses its non-covalent bonds
>
> Yes, roughly speaking.
>
> >and gains covalent bonds.
>
> No, generally not true.

Don't boiled eggs harden due the formation of covalent bonds?

http://science.howstuffworks.com/question616.htm

"As the temperature increases, the proteins gain enough energy to form
new, stronger bonds (covalent) with other protein molecules."

"As the proteins form these new, strong bonds, the water that
surrounded each protein molecule when the egg was liquid is forced
out."

> >Aren't covalent bonds more difficult to break than
> >non-covalent bonds? If so, how does denaturing a protein help digest it
> >into amino acids?
>
> By opening up its "core" and making it more accessible to the
> digestive enzymes.



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