DNA damage and Repair Positions

Charles Miller rellim at tulane.edu
Fri Nov 17 14:52:48 EST 2000


POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIP, MRC CELL MUTATION UNIT, UNIVERSITY  OF
SUSSEX, UK
        A postdoc position is available for a protein biochemist to work
in Alan Lehmann's lab at the University of Sussex on the structure and
function of the S.pombe Rad18 protein family, which we are studying in
both yeast and man. Rad18 is of importance for two reasons. First it is
involved in several repair pathways (repair of double-strand breaks and
tolerance of DNA damage), as well as having an essential function,
probably in DNA replication. Second, structurally the protein is a member
of the very important SMC family. SMC proteins from the cores of the
cohesins and condensins, respectively involved in sister chromatid
cohesion and chromosome condensation. Rad18 and its SMC partner Spr18 form
the core of a third SMC protein complex in S. pombe. We have purified this
protein complex and found that it contains at least five other
polypeptides, which we are currently trying to identify. We have also
isolated and characterised the human homologues of both Rad18 and Spr18,
showing that these proteins are conserved. The function of these proteins
in mammalian cells is currently under investigation.
        The work will include identifying activities of the complex, eg
DNA-binding, helicase activities,determining how the different components
interact, and understanding their individual functions. This work will
give insights into the way in which this important protein is involved in
the different repair processes.
        Send applications with CV, or e-mail for more information, to
a.r.lehmann at sussex.ac.uk
Also visit our Website on http://www.biols.susx.ac.uk/biols/MRC/labs.html

TENURE-TRACK POSITION - DNA REPAIR - NIAAA, BETHESDA, MD
        The Division of Intramural Clinical and Biological Research of the
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, is recruiting an
individual into a tenure-track position to develop and direct an
independent research program focused on the role of DNA damage and repair
in function and in relation to human disease.  This includes
carcinogenesis, teratogenesis and/or degenerative diseases in response to
genotoxic agents such as ethanol.  Candidates should have an outstanding
publication record and, when applicable, a history of independent research
funding.  The successful candidate will be provided with sufficient
resources in the form of personnel and funds to conduct original basic
research in DNA modification and repair.
Applicants must have a Ph.D. and/or M.D. degree and should submit a
curriculum vitae, bibliography, the names and addresses of three
individuals who can be contacted for a reference, and a statement of
research goals to:
Ms. Kathleen Hanratty
NIAAA, NIH
Bldg. 31, Room 1B58
31 Center Drive MSC 2088
Bethesda, MD 20892-2088
Tel: 301/402-2997 Fax: 301/402-0016
e-mail: kh54d at nih.gov
Applications should be received by December 15, 2000.  Candidates rated
highly qualified will be invited to present a seminar.  NIH is an equal
opportunity employer.
Candidates rated as highly qualified will be invited to present a seminar.





POST-DOCTORAL POSITION - BETHESDA, MD: DNA REPLICATION
        A postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Dr.
Mirit I. Aladjem at the National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD to study
the regulation of  DNA replication origins in mammalian cells.  The aim of
the research program is understanding how information from the cell cycle
machinery leads to the initiation of DNA replication.  The proposed
project is based on the observation (1) that in some mammalian loci,
initiation sites are determined by interaction between local sequences at
the origin of replication and distant regulatory sequences.   A recently
developed intrachromosomal initiation assay (2), combining biochemical
analysis with recombinase-mediated gene targeting (3) will be used to
evaluate the local and distant requirements for initiation.  We will then
be able to determine the cell cycle regulatory pathways that interact with
these sequences in normal and malignant cells.
The position is located in Bethesda, Maryland, a suburb of Washington,
D.C.  Applicants with a background in molecular biology and an interest in
DNA replication, cell cycle and mechanisms of carcinogenesis are
encouraged to contact the email address or the phone number below, or
Email:  aladjemm at mail.nih.gov
Mirit I. Aladjem, Ph.D.
Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology
DBS/NCI/NIH
Bldg. 37,  Rm 5D09
37 Convent Dr.
Bethesda, MD 20892-4255
Tel. 301-435-2848; Fax  301-402-0752



POSTDOCTORAL POSITION- UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS M.D. ANDERSON CANCER
CENTER, SCIENCE PARK-RESEARCH DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF CARCINOGENESIS
      A postdoctoral position is available immediately to study the
molecular mechanisms of DNA damage recognition and the role of unusual DNA
structures in genomic instability.  The studies involve techniques in
biochemistry, protein expression and purification, cell culture, and
molecular biology.
Please send a current CV, a letter of research interests, and a
list of references (including phone numbers and email addresses) to the
following address:
Dr. Karen M. Vasquez
Assistant Professor
U.T. M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Science Park-Research Division
P.O. Box 389
Smithville, TX 78957
Email:  kvasquez at sprd1.mdacc.tmc.edu
Phone: 512-237-9324, FAX:  512-237-2475




POST-DOCTORAL POSITION -BETHESDA, MD:  STRESS GENE AND CELL CYCLE
REGULATION
A position is available for a doctoral scientist with interest and
experience in the study of the regulation of mammalian stress gene
responses and/or the study of cell cycle control in mammalian cells.  This
is a postdoctoral position for a talented individual with less than 5
years of postdoctoral experience. Applicants should send a letter of
interest, C.V., and a list  of references, including telephone numbers and
e-mail addresses, to the following address:
Dr. A. J. Fornace Jr.
Head, Gene Response Section, BRL, DBS, NCI
Building 37, Room 5C09
National Institutes of Health
37 CONVENT DR MSC 4255
Bethesda, Maryland 20892-4255
TEL:  301 402 0744
FAX:  301 480 1946 (preferred)
                    301 480 2514 (alternative)
email:    fornace at nih.gov
http://rex.nci.nih.gov/RESEARCH/basic/lbc/fornace.htm



POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS IN SEATTLE
Our laboratory studies DNA recombination and repair in mammalian cells.We
focus on two processes that occur in activated B cells, class
switchrecombination and somatic hypermutation, and we also study the role
of general recombination/repair factors (Rad52, BLM helicase) in genomic
stability and instability.  We have just moved from Yale to the University
of Washington, and we seek to recruit talented, motivated, and interactive
individuals to postdoctoral positions in the laboratory.  Experience in
protein purification is useful, but not essential.
Please send c.v. and names of three references to:
Dr. Nancy Maizels
Departments of Immunology and Biochemistry
University of Washington Medical School, Room H474A HSB
1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357650
Seattle, WA  98195-7650
206-221-6876 (phone); 206-221-6781 (fax)
maizels at u.washington.edu




POST-DOC POSITION -DEPT OF CANCER CELL BIOLOGY - HARVARD SCHOOL
OF PUBLIC HEALTH  - BOSTON, MA
Post-Doc position available immediately to study the ubiquitination,
stability, and localization of p53, p53 family members, and other cell
cycle regulatory  proteins.  One goal of the lab is to determine the
mechanisms which regulate p53 nuclear export in normal and  stressed
cells.  See Nature Cell Biology (Sept. 2000) for most recent work.
Send resume to:
Dr. Carl Maki
Harvard School of Public Health
Dept. of Cancer Cell Biology
665 Huntington Ave.
Bldg. I, second floor
Boston, MA 02115
cmaki at hsph.harvard.edu


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