DNA repair interest group update-- Jan. 30, 2001

Charles Miller rellim at tulane.edu
Thu Feb 1 11:08:56 EST 2001


DNA Repair Interest Group -UPDATE - January 30, 2001

1.      VIDEOCONFERENCE -Tues, FEB 20, 2001 - 12:30 PM - Dr. Vilhelm Bohr
- LMG, NIA, Baltimore, MD -  DNA repair defects in premature aging
disorders

2.      ANNOUNCEMENTS: BIORECRUIT website; HUMAN GENOME ON THE WEB; NEW
JOURNAL - MITOCHONDRION

3. CONFERENCES - DNA REPAIR CONF, NOORDWIJKERHOUT, THE NETHERLANDS;  EMS
ANNUAL MEETING; MIDWEST DNA REPAIR MEETING; FASEB HELICASE MEETING

4. XP SUPPORT GROUPS - UK and US

5.      POST DOC AND EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Bethesda, MD; Smithville,
TX; San Francisco, CA; Brookhaven NL; Gaithersburg, MD; Bethesda, MD;
Smithville, TX; Bethesda; Seattle; Boston

6.      Electronic Contacts



1.0     DNA REPAIR VIDEOCONFERENCE:

        Tues, FEB 20, 2001 - 12:30 PM - Dr. Vilhelm Bohr - LMG, NIA,
Baltimore, MD -  DNA repair defects in premature aging disorders

VIDEOCONFERENCE LOCATIONS:  Room 1E03 GRC Baltimore, MD (ORIGIN); MD
Anderson, Smithville, TX; Univ of Kentucky, Lexington, KY; Building 45
(NATCHER) Room H, Bethesda, MD ; Building 101 Room B200, NIEHS, Research
Triangle Park,  NC; Building 549, Conference Room A,  FCRDC, Frederick,
MD; State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY; Lawrence Livermore
Labs, Livermore, CA; Univ of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and Brookhaven National
Labs, Upton, NY. MBONE ACCESS (NIH ONLY) and in the internet at
http://videocast.nih.gov

1.1     DNA REPAIR VIDEOCONFERENCE - FUTURE DATES AND VIDEO ARCHIVE
[Note: A larger and more up to date list of future and past
videoconferences can be found on the DNA Repair Interest Group web site:
http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/ ]

1.1.1 FUTURE VIDEOCONFERENCES:

Tues, Mar 20, 2001 - Short talks by post-doctoral fellows at 3 sites:

Peter Beernink, LLNL - A Second Divalent Metal Ion in the Active Site of a
New Crystal Form of Human Apurinic/Apyridinimic Endonuclease, Ape1, and
its Implications for the Catalytic Mechanism
Yong Hwan Jin, NIEHS - The 3'-5' Exonuclease of DNA Polymerase d is
Redundant with
5'-flap Endonuclease Rad27/Fen1 for Processing of Okazaki Fragments
Robert M. Brosh, NIA - Molecular Interactions of the Werner Syndrome
Protein

Tues, Apr 17, 2001 - Dr. Arthur Grollman -SUNY Stony Brook, NY -
Recognition of Oxidative damage by DNA Glycosylases

Tues, May 15, 2001- Dr. Bill Copeland - Laboratory of Molecular Genetics
NIEHS - Mitochondrial DNA Replication Fidelity and Mitochondrial Diseases

Tues, June 19, 2001 - Dr. James Cleaver -Univ of California, San
Francisco, CA - History of DNA Repair - Mending Human Genes

1.1.2 VIDEOARCHIVES: INTERNET ACCESS (WORLDWIDE):

Now 30 of these videoconferences have been archived and are available for
viewing at your leisure on the internet. You will need a web browser (with
a high speed link) and free Real Video software.  Setup details and access
are available at the NIH videocast website:  http://videocast.nih.gov. Go
to Unicast sessions; Past events; DNA Repair Interest Group Sessions.

Note: Technical improvements are made regularly on this site to increase
transmission speeds and ease of access. If you were not successful in
viewing these videos in the past it is worth trying again!

JAN 16, 2001- Dr. Mats Ljungman - Univ of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI -Stopped
in its tracks - RNA polymerase II as a sensor for DNA damage

DEC 19, 2000 - Dr. Patrick Sung - University of Texas Health Science
Center at San Antonio - Functional Interactions Among RAD52 Group Proteins
in Recombination and Repair

NOV 21, 2000 -Dr. Zhigang Wang - Univ of Kentucky -Translesion synthesis
by the UmuC family of DNA polymerase

OCT 17, 2000- Dr. Yoshihiro Matsumoto - Fox Chase Cancer Center,
Philadelphia, PA -Functions of PCNA in Base Excision Repair

SEPT 19, 2000 - Dr. Kenneth Kraemer, NCI, Bethesda, MD  -Clinical and
Molecular Features of Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Related Disorders of DNA
Repair

JUNE 20, 2000- Dr. Richard Setlow , Brookhaven National Lab- Reflections
on how I was led into and onto DNA Repair -  Host:  SUNY

MAY 16, 2000  Dr. Veronica Maher, Michigan State Univ - Role of DNA
Replication and Repair in Carcinogen-Induced Human Cell Mutagenesis  Host:
U of Michigan [Note: this talk will be posted after the data presented is
published]

APR 18, 2000 - Dr. Peter Glazer, Yale Univ - Targeted genome modification
via DNA triple helix formation

MAR 21, 2000 - Research reports by 3 Postdoctoral fellows:
Dr. Steffen Emmert, NCI - The xeroderma pigmentosum group C gene leads to
selective repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers rather than 6-4
photoproducts. [See recent paper describing this work: Proc. Natl. Acad.
Sci. USA 97: 2151-2156, 2000]

Dr. Robert Sobol, NIEHS - Mutagenesis and dRP Lyase Activity in DNA
-Polymerase Dependent Base Excision Repair in Mouse Cells [See recent
paper by Dr. Sobol describing this work:  Nature 405, 807-810 (2000)]

Mr. Robert Levine, SUNY -Mutagenesis Induced by Endogenous DNA Adducts in
Human Cells

FEB 15, 2000  Dr Steve Matson, UNC - Two E. coli mismatch repair enzymes,
DNA helicase II and MutL, interact to catalyze efficient unwinding of
duplex DNA

JAN 18, 2000- Dr. John Essigman, MIT - Cellular responses to the DNA
damaging agent cisplatin

Through the miracle of vidotape we now have been able to post most of the
DNA Repair Interest Group videoconferences from 1998 and 1999 on the web
site.  These include talks by Drs. Bogenhagen, Sutherland, Kunkel,
Stefanini, Hanawalt, Matson, Sharan, Kashlev , Fornace, Anderson, Leadon,
Brooks, McKay, Drotschmann, Chu, Thompson, Woodgate,George, Liu and
Grossman

2. ANNOUNCEMENTS: BIORECRUIT website; HUMAN GENOME ON THE WEB; NEW JOURNAL
- MITOCHONDRION

2.1 Paul Heelis writes:
I would like to take this opportunity to inform you of a recently created
site at http://www.biorecruit.net

Biorecruit.net specialises in the biosciences area and already has links
from university bioscience departments from around the world.

I would like to offer you the chance to advertise as many postdoctoral,
fellowships and any other position that you feel appropriate
completelyFREE of charge.

2.2     SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT - HUMAN GENOME ON THE WEB
Dr Francis Collins, head of the NHGRI writes:
        A few weeks ago, the international human genome sequencing
consortium described (in a letter published in the Sept. 1 issue of
Science and in a news brief published in the Aug. 31 issue of Nature) a
number of electronic sites where the public working draft version of the
human sequence can be found in its most useable forms. However, it is
clear from a number of recent interactions with investigators, that many
are still not aware of the accessibility of this important information. I
am writing to make sure that you are aware that the working draft sequence
is available and to ask your assistance in helping to make the
entirescientific community aware of this valuable resource, by
distributing the attached information describing three sites that display
the entire
working draft sequence and provide tools for its use.

The following links will take investigators directly to three different
(but complementary) assembled views of the human genome,together with
useful browsing tools that provide a wide variety ofannotations of the
sequence. These sites are updated very frequently,
indeed almost continually.

U. Calif. at Santa Cruz
http://genome.ucsc.edu/

National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/guide/
and click "Map Viewer"

European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI)
http://www.ensembl.org/

2.3 New journal: MITOCHONDRION
Dr. Keshav Singh <singhke at JHMI.EDU> writes:
Dear Colleague:
        I invite you to submit your research articles to a new journal
"Mitochondrion" dedicated to research on mitochondria. The scope of this
journal is broad, from reporting on the basic science of mitochondria in
all model systems to reporting on pathology and clinical aspects of
mitochondrial diseases. The journal welcomes articles for publication by
investigators working in diverse disciplines such as aging, cancer,
biophysics, biochemistry, cell biology, evolution, genetics, molecular
biology, neurobiology, pharmacology, plant biology, program cell death,
toxicology, and clinical aspects of mitochondrial diseases. Detailed
instructions to authors can be found either www.mitoresearch.org or
www.elsevier.com/locate/mito.


Please join us and make the "Mitochondrion" journal the best journal on
mitochondria devoted to mitochondria research.
Sincerely,
Keshav Singh
Editor-in-Chief
Mitochondrion

Johns Hopkins Oncology Center
Bunting-Blaustein Cancer Research Building
1650 Orleans Street, Room 143
Baltimore, MD 21231
TEL: 410-614-5128  Fax: 410-502-7234


3.  CONFERENCES - DNA REPAIR CONF, NOORDWIJKERHOUT, THE NETHERLANDS;  EMS
ANNUAL MEETING; MIDWEST DNA REPAIR MEETING; FASEB HELICASE MEETING

[Note: A larger and more up-to-date list of conferences can be found on
the DNA Repair Interest Group web site:
http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/ ]

3.1   DNA REPAIR: INTERPLAY WITH OTHER CELLULAR PROCESSES -
NOORDWIJKERHOUT, THE NETHERLANDS FEB 25 - MAR 2, 2001

The Concerted Action on "Genetic Disorders associated with defects in DNA
repair" (a project of the European Union) will be funding a workshop on
"DNA repair: interplay with other cellular processes" in Noordwijkerhout,
The Netherlands from February 25 to March 2, 2001. The participants will
be members from European laboratories that are part of the Concerted
Action, as well as scientists from outside the EU. The total number of
participants is limited to maximally 250. The Workshop can be regarded  as
the European counterpart of the UCLA and Gordon Conferences on DNA repair
in the U.S.A.

We invite applicants for a limited number of about 80 places. These places
will be distributed on the basis of abstracts submitted for poster
presentations. The deadline for the submission is November 15. The
Organising Committee hopes to inform applicants about acceptances in the
first half of December.

The format of the meeting is similar to that of previous DNA Repair
meetings in Noordwijkerhout (in 1996 and 1991 and before), i.e. plenary
talks in the mornings, posters with intensive discussion sessions in the
afternoons, and evenings. The last day will be mainly devoted to a special
Symposium in which we will focus on new technology that we anticipate to
be relevant for future research in DNA repair.

Extensive information about the Workshop including a preliminary
programme, costs etc. can be found at the conference website:
http://www.medgencentre.nl/Workshop2001/

To apply: fill in the electronic registration form at the website not
later than November 15, 2000.  Send us an abstract for your poster not
later than November 15, 2000 (by e-mail to the meeting secretary
ferro at lumc.nl ; see instructions at the website).

3.2      EMS ANNUAL MEETING - SAN DIEGO, MAR 16-21, 2001

The Environmental Mutagen Society annual meeting will be held on March
16-21, 2001 in San Diego, CA, at the Paradise Point Resort Hotel. The
entire meeting is organized and the complete program and all registration
details are available from David M. DeMarini, Ph.D. (See below for contact
information  for obtaining a PDF file of the6 page brochure).  We have 3
symposia on DNA repair, and we have Stephen J. Gould as our keynote
speaker.  Information is also available on the EMS website:
http://www.ems-us.org/

For more information contact:

David M. DeMarini, Ph.D.
Environmental Carcinogenesis Division (MD-68)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711, USA
TEL 1-919-541-1510
FAX 1-919-541-0694
demarini.david at epa.gov

3.3     THIRD ANNUAL MIDWEST DNA REPAIR SYMPOSIUM: JUNE 2-3, 2001 INDIANA
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, INDIANAPOLIS, IN
        Keynote speakers: Dr. Samuel H. Wilson, NIEHS, Dr. Stanton L.
Gerson, Case Western Reserve Univ.
        Contact information:
        Drs Mark Kelley and David A. Williams
        TEL: 317-274-2755;      FAX; 317-274-5378;
        e-mail:  mkelley at iupui.edu

3.4     HELICASES: STRUCTURE, FUNCTION AND ROLES IN HUMAN DISEASE  -JULY
7-12, 2001  VERMONT ACADEMY,  SAXTONS RIVER VERMONT

A FASEB helicase meeting to be held July 7-12, 2001 at the Vermont
Academy, Saxtons River Vermont.

Session subtopics include:
Helicase Structure
Helicase Function and Mechanism
Helicases in DNA Replication
Helicases in DNA Repair and Recombination
RNA Helicases in Transcription, Splicing, RNA stability and transport
RNA Helicases in Translation and  Ribosome Biogenesis
Helicases as part of macromolecular machines
Helicases in Viral Replication
Helicases in Cancer and Aging.

This will be the first meeting held in the United States dedicated
entirely to helicases.   Further information can be obtained from meeting
organizers:  Sandy Weller, University of Connecticut HealthCenter,
weller at nso2.uchc.edu, 860-679-2310 and Steve Matson, Univeristy of North
Carolina smatson at bio.unc.edu, 919-962-0005.  Vice-chairs will be Anna
Marie Pyle (amp11 at columbia.edu) and Smita Patel (patelss at umdnj.edu).
Please pass on to colleagues who may be interested.

4.      XP SUPPORT GROUPS - UK and US

4.1     UNITED KINGDOM XERODERMA PIGMENTOSUM SUPPORT GROUP
        We are pleased to announce the opening of the UK XP Support Group
Website at http://xpsupportgroup.org.uk The site gives up to date
information that is held by the Support Group as well as details of
forthcoming events and Newsletters.

4.2     XP SOCIETY
        The US XP Society is an active group involved in education, fund
raising, and providing information for XP patients worldwide. They run
Camp Sundown a summer camp with activities in the evening and night for XP
patients and their families. Their website is http://www.xps.org


5. POST DOC and EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: Smithville, TX; San Francisco,
CA;  Brookhaven NL; Gaithersburg, MD; Bethesda, MD; Smithville, TX;
Bethesda; Seattle; Boston

[Note: Check the list for more Job Opportunities on the DNA Repair
Interest Group web site: http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/ ]

5.1    POSTDOCTORAL POSITION- UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS M.D. ANDERSON CANCER
CENTER, SCIENCE PARK-RESEARCH DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF CARCINOGENESIS
A position is available for a doctoral scientist with U.S. citizenship
with interest and experience in the study of DNA damage and mutation.  The
project is funded by the Life in Extreme Environments program at NSF and
will involve studies on the relationship between DNA degradation and
speciation in glacial bacteria.  Experience with Comet assay, bacterial
genetics, or mismatch repair would be helpful.  If interested please
contact (by phone or email):

David L. Mitchell, Ph.D.
Associate Professor Department of Carcinogenesis
The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Science Park/Research Division
P.O. Box 389 Smithville, TX 78957
Phone: (512) 237-9474 Email: dmitch at io.com

5.2 POSTDOCTORAL POSITION AT UCSF CANCER CENTER, SAN FRANCISCO
Position available immediately, for research involving DNA repair and
error-prone DNA polymerases, recombination, genomic changes associated
with malignancy, and transgenic animal models of repair defective diseases
involving cancer and neurodegeneration (XP, CS etc).
UCSF Cancer Center has excellent state-of-the-art support services in gene
expression arrays, molecular cytogenetics, and transgenic animals.
Experience in molecular biology, especially vector construction, required.
Salary: NIH postdoctoral level plus supplement for San Francisco. US
citizens or immigrant visa required.
Contact:
James E. Cleaver, PhD
Box 0808,
UCSF Cancer Center,
University of California,
San Francisco, CA, 94143.
Fax 415-476-8218. E-mail: jcleaver at cc.ucsf.edu
Send resume and 3 references. UCSF is an equal opportunity employer.


5.3 POST-DOCTORAL POSITION STUDYING DNA DAMAGE CLUSTERS: BIOLOGY
DEPARTMENT, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

Postdoctoral position for recent Ph.D., studying molecular aspects of
induction and repair of DNA damage clusters in mammalian cells. {See our
recent publications: Sutherland et al. (2000) DNA Damage Clusters Induced
by Ionizing Radiation in Isolated DNA and in Human Cells, Proc. Natl.
Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97:103-108; Sutherland et al., (2000) Clustered Damages
and Total Lesions Induced in DNA by Ionizing Radiation: Oxidized Bases and
Strand Breaks, Biochemistry, 39:8026-8031}.  New position in highly
interacting, multi-expertise group of Betsy Sutherland, Biology
Department, Brookhaven National Lab, in collaboration with Jacques Laval,
Institut Gustav Roussy, France. Requires Ph.D. or equivalent in radiation
biology/biochemistry or molecular biology. Good communication skills and
ability to interact with scientists, professional staff and students of a
wide variety of backgounds essential. Potential for participation in
NASA-funded Heavy Ion Radiobiology program at BNL.  Must be willing to
travel to collaborating institutions.  One year initial appointment, with
possibility of renewal.
For more information or to apply, send your C.V., description of your
research experience and interests, and names, addresses, telephone numbers
and email addresses of at least three references to:
Dr. Betsy Sutherland,
Biology Department,Brookhaven National Lab,
Upton, Long Island, New York 11973
TEL: 631 344-3380; FAX 631 344-3407
email:bms at bnl.gov.
BNL is an equal opportunity employer; women and minorities are especially
encouraged to apply.



5.4 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN PHARMACOGENETICS -NOVARTIS PHARMACEUTICALS
CORPORATION,  GAITHERSBURG, MD

Senior Scientists
(3 Positions in Gaithersburg, MD)
The successful candidates will be part of a team that is focusing on the
study of genetic factors underlying drug response, utilizing the latest
cutting edge technologies. Responsibilities will include management of
projects, analysis of gene expression and genotyping data, publishing, and
patent application.
Minimum Requirements: Ph.D. in cell biology, biochemistry, human genetics
or a related field. Strong knowledge of drug metabolism, signal
transduction pathways, and experience in gene expression profiling and
patent writing are a plus.
These positions require excellent communication skills and the ability to
work efficiently within a team environment. Demonstrated record of
scientific publishing desirable.

Bioinformatics: Systems Analyst/Programming
(3  Positions in Gaithersburg, MD)
The successful candidates will be involved in the design and development
of scientific web database applications in close collaboration with
scientists.
Minimum Requirements: College education and experience with Java, Perl,
SQL, Oracle, PL/SQL, C and CGI. A background in research and genetics is
desired. Experience with Oracle Application Server is a plus.

Assistant Scientists
(4 Positions in Gaithersburg, MD)
The successful candidates will be involved in high throughput genotyping
and gene expression profiling, positional cloning of complex disease genes
and mutation analysis of candidate genes. Technologies used include
general molecular genetics protocols, DNA/RNA extraction, PCR, sequencing
and cloning, microarray analysis.
Minimum Requirements: B.S. in Molecular Biology, or related field.
Candidates should have excellent organizational skills, be efficient and
dependable. Ability to adapt to new technologies and to work in a high
throughput and challenging environment is essential.

At Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation we offer excellent compensation
and benefits programs that reflect our position as industry leaders. The
programs include medical, dental, vision, legal and financial planning
services, life insurance, 401K as well as leadership development
initiatives. Find out how fulfilling your career can be.
For more information about us, visit our website at novartis.com or
forward your resume/curriculum vitae and letter of interest to Novartis
Pharmaceuticals Corp. Pharmacogenetics 9 West Watkins Mill road,  room
264. Gaithersburg, MD 20878. We are an equal opportunity employer M/F/D/V.
We appreciate your interest in our company. Unfortunately, we will only be
able to respond to those candidates chosen for interviews or additional
follow-up.

5.5     POST-DOCTORAL POSITION - BETHESDA, MD: DNA REPLICATION
        A postdoctoral position is available in the laboratory of Dr.
Mirit I. Aladjem at the National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD to study
the regulation of  DNA replication origins in mammalian cells.  The aim of
the research program is understanding how information from the cell cycle
machinery leads to the initiation of DNA replication.  The proposed
project is based on the observation (1) that in some mammalian loci,
initiation sites are determined by interaction between local sequences at
the origin of replication and distant regulatory sequences.   A recently
developed intrachromosomal initiation assay (2), combining biochemical
analysis with recombinase-mediated gene targeting (3) will be used to
evaluate the local and distant requirements for initiation.  We will then
be able to determine the cell cycle regulatory pathways that interact with
these sequences in normal and malignant cells.

The position is located in Bethesda, Maryland, a suburb of Washington,
D.C.  Applicants with a background in molecular biology and an interest in
DNA replication, cell cycle and mechanisms of carcinogenesis are
encouraged to contact the email address or the phone number below, or
Email:  aladjemm at mail.nih.gov

Mirit I. Aladjem, Ph.D.
Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology
DBS/NCI/NIH
Bldg. 37,  Rm 5D09
37 Convent Dr.
Bethesda, MD 20892-4255
Tel. 301-435-2848; Fax  301-402-0752

5.6     POSTDOCTORAL POSITION- UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS M.D. ANDERSON CANCER
CENTER, SCIENCE PARK-RESEARCH DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF CARCINOGENESIS
      A postdoctoral position is available immediately to study the
molecular mechanisms of DNA damage recognition and the role of unusual DNA
structures in genomic instability.  The studies involve techniques in
biochemistry, protein expression and purification, cell culture, and
molecular biology.

        Please send a current CV, a letter of research interests, and a
list of references (including phone numbers and email addresses) to the
following address:

Dr. Karen M. Vasquez
Assistant Professor
U.T. M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Science Park-Research Division
P.O. Box 389
Smithville, TX 78957
Email:  kvasquez at sprd1.mdacc.tmc.edu
Phone: 512-237-9324, FAX:  512-237-2475

5.7     POST-DOCTORAL POSITION -BETHESDA, MD:  STRESS GENE AND CELL CYCLE
REGULATION
        A position is available for a doctoral scientist with interest and
experience in the study of the regulation of mammalian stress gene
responses and/or the study of cell cycle control in mammalian cells.  This
is a postdoctoral position for a talented individual with less than 5
years of postdoctoral experience. Applicants should send a letter of
interest, C.V., and a list  of references, including telephone numbers and
e-mail addresses, to the following address:
Dr. A. J. Fornace Jr.
Head, Gene Response Section, BRL, DBS, NCI
Building 37, Room 5C09
National Institutes of Health
37 CONVENT DR MSC 4255
Bethesda, Maryland 20892-4255
TEL:  301 402 0744
FAX:  301 480 1946 (preferred)
                    301 480 2514 (alternative)
email:    fornace at nih.gov
http://rex.nci.nih.gov/RESEARCH/basic/lbc/fornace.htm

5.8     POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS IN SEATTLE
Our laboratory studies DNA recombination and repair in mammalian cells.We
focus on two processes that occur in activated B cells, class
switchrecombination and somatic hypermutation, and we also study the role
of general recombination/repair factors (Rad52, BLM helicase) in genomic
stability and instability.  We have just moved from Yale to the University
of Washington, and we seek to recruit talented, motivated, and interactive
individuals to postdoctoral positions in the laboratory.  Experience in
protein purification is useful, but not essential.

Please send c.v. and names of three references to:
Dr. Nancy Maizels
Departments of Immunology and Biochemistry
University of Washington Medical School, Room H474A HSB
1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357650
Seattle, WA  98195-7650
206-221-6876 (phone); 206-221-6781 (fax)
maizels at u.washington.edu


5.9      POST-DOC POSITION -DEPT OF CANCER CELL BIOLOGY - HARVARD SCHOOL
OF PUBLIC HEALTH  - BOSTON, MA
Post-Doc position available immediately to study the ubiquitination,
stability, and localization of p53, p53 family members, and other cell
cycle regulatory  proteins.  One goal of the lab is to determine the
mechanisms which regulate p53 nuclear export in normal and  stressed
cells.  See Nature Cell Biology (Sept. 2000) for most recent work.
Send resume to:
Dr. Carl Maki
Harvard School of Public Health
Dept. of Cancer Cell Biology
665 Huntington Ave.
Bldg. I, second floor
Boston, MA 02115
cmaki at hsph.harvard.edu

6.      ELECTRONIC CONTACTS:
6.1     Check out the DNA Repair Interest Group web site:
http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/
You can find the schedule for future DNA Repair Interest Group
videoconferences and a listing of past videoconferences (with links to the
videoarchive) as well as a current list of JOB OPPORTUNITIES in DNA repair
and MEETING NOTICES.

6.2     Encourage your colleagues who are interested in DNA Repair to
request that they be added to this DNA Repair Interest Group listserve
e-mail list by sending a request by e-mail to: listserv at list.nih.gov
Leave the subject  blank. In the message field, type in: subscribe
DNARepair-L your name
        Alternatively, by filling out the form on the website you can both
add your name to the e-mail list and have your name posted on the website.
If you want your name to be listed you can fill out the "Join the SIG"
form on the web site and add your name to the listing of members.  If you
are not at NIH then be sure to click the "other" box and then fill in the
name of your institution.

6.3     Archives of these listserve mailings can be found at
        http://list.nih.gov/archives/dnarepair-l.html
                or via links from the DNA Repair Interest Group web site:
http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/

6.4     I will be happy to relay information about post-doctoral
positions, jobs and meetings and other information related to DNA Repair.
Please send me an e-mail message (kraemerk at nih.gov) and I will incorporate
it into the next announcement list and post it on the DNA Repair Interest
Group web site: http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/ .
(This list goes to more than 675 scientists around the world who are
interested in DNA repair.)


Kenneth H. Kraemer, M.D.
Basic Research Laboratory
National Cancer Institute
Building 37 Room 3E24
Bethesda,  MD 20892
301-496-9033    FAX: 301-496-8419
e-mail: kraemerk at nih.gov
DNA Repair Interest Group web site:
http://www.nih.gov:80/sigs/dna-rep/



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